Oatmeal Pancakes

June 18, 2011

I may have mentioned before that I love oatmeal. I really do. I prefer the steel-cut oats, you know, the “real deal” oatmeal. But I must admit, anything oatmeal will get my attention. So I was very eager to try out these Oatmeal Pancakes that I spotted in the Features section of TasteSpotting. Not only did they have wonderful steel-cut oats in them, but they also have oat flour which I was able to make by myself by simply pulsing rolled oats in my food processor. This gave the pancakes a great texture. Mind you they weren’t those lighter than air pancakes which could conceivably (in my mind anyway…) float right off of your plate if they weren’t weighted down by copious amounts of butter and syrup. These cakes had some body. I think that’s a good thing. (Not that I don’t occasionally like the copious butter and syrup types as well…)

We topped these pancakes with fresh strawberries, raspberries and blueberries and a wee bit of maple syrup. We really didn’t need much on the syrup front because the fruit has been so incredibly tasty this year.

They were delicious! There you have it. A fantastic breakfast that you can argue is actually good for you…it has the oatmeal and the fruit, right?

Oatmeal Pancakes

recipe from TasteSpotting (the blog)

makes about ten 4-5 inch pancakes

Ingredients:

  • ¾ cup oat flour (make it yourself by pulsing rolled oats in your food processor)
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1¼ cups whole milk
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup cooked oatmeal (we used steel-cut oats, but rolled oats are fine)
  • fresh fruit of your choice

Directions:

Whisk oat flour, flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large bowl.

In a separate bowl, whisk the butter, milk, and eggs together until thoroughly combined. Stir in cooked oatmeal.

Fold butter/milk/eggs mixture into flour mixture with only a few strokes of a large spoon or spatula.

Heat a large frying pan over medium heat until hot (throw a couple of drops of water onto the pan – if they sizzle away, the pan is hot). Melt about ½ tablespoon of butter in the hot pan, swirl to coat, then ladle 2-3 ¼-cup mounds of batter onto the pan.

Cook the pancakes on one side until air bubbles form and edges are dry, about 2 minutes. Turn the pancakes over. Cook the other side of the pancakes about 1-2 minutes, remove from pan.

Wipe pan with a damp paper towel (to pick up the browned pancake bits), and repeat cooking pancakes.

Serve warm, topped with fresh fruit and a tiny drizzle of pure maple syrup.


Snowy Morning Steel Cut Oats

March 27, 2011

It’s the end of March. Flowers are bloomin, birds are singing, we’re wearing short sleeves and light jackets, it’s our long-awaited Spring right? Well turns out Spring has not quite sprung. Winter is still holding on. We woke up this morning to find snow on the ground. Are you kiddin me?!! All of the tender new blooms are covered with snow.

Thankfully it wasn’t much more than a dusting. The one good thing I can say about the snowy morning is that it put us in the mood for slow-cooked, steel-cut oatmeal. I like oatmeal year round, but find it absolutely perfect on a cold, snowy morning. While I will do instant oatmeal in a pinch, I prefer the good old-fashioned kind, John McCann’s Steel Cut Irish Oatmeal to be specific. This oatmeal has a wonderful nutty flavour and is a bit chewier than the rolled oat variety.

How are “steel-cut” oatmeal different from “old-fashioned rolled oats”? Both are from the same whole raw oat, they are just cut differently. The steel-cut oatmeal is the whole raw oat cut into chunks. It takes longer to cook than the rolled oats, which are the whole raw oat which is steamed and then rolled flat. This process results in a quicker cooking time for the rolled oat oatmeal.

Steel-Cut Oats & Rolled Oats

The nutritional value is essentially the same for both types. And speaking of nutritional value, oatmeal is packed full of health benefits. It is low in saturated fat, sodium free and cholesterol free. It is high in soluble fiber which has been shown to lower blood cholesterol as well as slow digestion which aids in weight control. It also helps to stabilize blood glucose level which lowers the risk of type II diabetes. What are you waiting for? You should definitely get started, because it does take some time, about 30 minutes or so, to cook steel-cut oatmeal. You can reduce cooking time a bit by letting the oats soak in water for an hour before or up to the night before you are planning to prepare them. I usually plan to make it on the weekends when I have more time. I make a big pot so that I will have extra little cup size servings of oatmeal that I can simply reheat it in the microwave during the week.

Breakfast for the week

To make steel-cut oats, you sprinkle 1 cup of the oats over four cups of briskly boiling water. Stir well. Once the oatmeal is smooth and beginning to thicken, reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. At this point I add a pinch of salt, cinnamon and vanilla extract. Once its done, you can top it with whatever you like. We generally go for bananas, apples, and fresh strawberries, a little butter, and chopped pecans or walnuts. We would have put some of our scrumptious Pear & Rosemary Conserve on it, from my previous post, but we had eaten it all! I know lots of folks like to add a splash of cream, chocolate chips or maple syrup. Really that’s what so fun about it, you can customize it however you want. It’s both yummy and good for you. Get some today!


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