Caramelized Banana Upside Down Cake

October 5, 2016

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Who doesn’t like the heavenly combination of bananas and caramel? Well this gorgeous Caramelized Banana Upside Down Cake is blanketed with them! It is like Bananas Foster in cake form. So you know the topping is to die for, but the cake is pretty spectacular itself. It is incredibly moist and tender and would be delicious all on its own. But it isn’t alone at all. No indeed. It is topped with all of those sticky, buttery caramelized bananas. Sheer perfection I tell you!

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I made this cake for the Husband. I’ve told you how he just loves all fruit desserts. Well he definitely has a particular soft spot for bananas, so I knew he’d be over the moon for this cake. Lucky for me, it is very easy to whip together because I think it will end up being in high rotation on the dessert roster around here. I came across the recipe on the Broma Bakery blog, but did adapt it a bit. I added some spices and a bunch of rum because…well because how could I resist the delicious combo of bananas and rum? Yeah, I couldn’t. A little booze seems to make anything better, and this cake is no exception. A slice is lovely served solo but a scoop of ice cream or a dollop of whip cream never goes unwelcome.

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The cake is easy to make and comes together quickly. In a little over an hour you can have it on the table. My my my….irresistible looks and heavenly taste – you can’t go wrong with this treat. So if you have some unclaimed bananas hanging around, you know what to do!

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Caramelized Banana Upside Down Cake

  • Servings: one 9
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

recipe adapted from: Broma Bakery

Ingredients:

For the Caramelized topping:

  • 6 Tablespoons butter
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla bean paste
  • 2 Tablespoons Dark Rum
  • 2 – 3 bananas, sliced

For the Cake:

  • 1 banana, mashed
  • 3 Tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1 egg, room temperature
  • 1/3 cup buttermilk
  • 1 Tablespoon Rum
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350° F. Grease a 9″ springform pan with butter. Line with parchment paper and butter the parchment paper as well. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil or parchment and place springform pan on it.

Place the butter brown sugar and vanilla bean paste in a small sauce pan. Heat over low heat until the butter melts. Mix together well. Remove from heat and stir in the rum. Pour the sugar mixture into the bottom of the prepared  springform pan and spread it around evenly. Place the sliced bananas on top of the brown sugar in a circular pattern.

In a medium bowl, mix the baking powder, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg and flour. Set aside.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, place the mashed banana, melted butter, egg, buttermilk, rum, sugar and vanilla bean paste. Mix until combined.

Add the flour mixture to the banana/ buttermilk/ rum mixture and stir until just combined.

Spread the batter evenly over the top of the brown sugar & sliced bananas in the springform pan.

Place in the oven and bake for 40 minutes, or until the top has started to turn golden brown along the edges.

Remove from the oven and allow cake to cool on a wire rack for 10 – 15 minutes. Invert cake onto serving platter.

Serve with vanilla ice cream or perhaps a little whipped cream!

Enjoy!

Caramelized Banana Upside Down Cake brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

Links to Useful Kitchen Tools & Ingredients for Caramelized Banana Upside Down Cake:

Kitchen Aid Artisan Stand Mixer

Nielsen Massey Madagascar Bourbon Pure Vanilla Bean Paste

Kitchen Aid Classic 9″ Springform Pan

9″ Parchment Paper Liners

 


Tres Leches Cake with Dulce de Leche Glaze

May 3, 2016

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Cinco de Mayo is only a couple of days away. You know, Cinco de Mayo. That is the date that folks in Mexico commemorate their victory over France in the Battle of Puebla which took place way back in 1862. I’m not so sure folks here in America know exactly why they’re celebrating, but hey we’ll take any chance for a party, so we’re happy to join in! And it just so happens that I’ve got a great dish for you to bring along to your celebrations…Tres Leches Cake with a boozy, rum laden Dulce de Leche Glaze! Let me tell you, this cake is da bomb! So moist, so sweet and rich, it nearly defies the imagination.

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For those few folks out there who haven’t heard of this confection before, allow me to tell you all about it. “Tres Leches” translates to “three milks”. A Tres Leches cake is a light and airy sponge cake which has been soaked in a milk bath mixture of three different milks, evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk and heavy cream. Although its origins are not clear, this dessert is very popular in Latin America. And once you take one bite, I assure you, you will know why. That sponge cake soaks up every bit of that sweet, dreamy, ambrosia of a soaking mixture creating the most amazing texture. You might think it would be soggy, but nope. Not soggy, but moist sweet boozy perfection.

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And that rum spiked Dulce de Leche glaze really puts this cake over the top. This recipe is easy but please take care to follow the directions. Now, I won’t lie, there are a few nail-biting moments along the way, like when you suspend the cake upside down to cool (I was sure it was going to fall into a huge pile of crumbles on the counter, but it didn’t) and then when you pour an impossible amount of liquid over the cake (I was sure it would not all get absorbed and my cake would be left ruined bobbing around in that milk lake, but it soaked it all up like a sponge. Maybe that’s why its called a “sponge cake” huh?). Have faith, the cake will be fantastic and you’ll be a Cinco de Mayo legend!

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Tres Leches Cake with Dulce de Leche Glaze

  • Servings: 24 Two Inch Squares
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Recipe from: Once Upon a Chef (One of my absolute favorite blogs! Definitely Check it out!)

Ingredients:

For the Cake:

  • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour or unbleached cake flour, spooned and leveled
  • 1 cup sugar, divided
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • large egg yolks, at room temperature
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 5 large egg whites, at room temperature
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

For the Milk Bath (soaking mixture):

  • 1 (12-ounce) can evaporated milk
  • 1 (14-ounce) can sweetened condensed milk
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons heavy cream
  • 3 tablespoons dark rum

For the Glaze:

  • (13-ounce) can dulce de leche (I found this at the local grocery store in the “Hispanic Specialties” section.)
  • 1 tablespoon dark rum
  • 1/4 cup water

For Baking:

  • One 9 x 13 x 2-inch Pyrex pan, ungreased, plus 4 cups or glasses for inverting the cake pan after baking

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 325° F.

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the flour, 3/4 cup of the sugar, and baking powder. Mix on low speed for 1 minute to combine. Do not over-mix.

In a medium bowl, whisk the egg yolks to break them up. Whisk in the oil, water and vanilla, one at a time. Add this mixture to the flour mixture and beat with the paddle on medium speed for exactly one minute to aerate it slightly (it’s very important not to overmix). Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula and beat for just a few seconds more.

In a clean, dry mixing bowl combine the egg whites and salt. Place on the mixer with the whisk attachment (or you can use a hand held mixer with beaters) and whip the egg whites on medium speed until they are white, foamy and beginning to hold a very soft peak. Increase the speed to medium high and add the remaining 1/4 cup sugar in a slow stream. Continue whipping the egg whites until they are shiny and hold stiff peaks.

With a large rubber spatula, fold the egg whites into the batter until just combined. Be very careful not to over-mix. Scrape the batter into the ungreased pan and smooth the top. Bake the cake for about 40 minutes, or until it is set in the middle and golden. Let the cake settle on the stovetop or a rack for 1-2 minutes, then invert four glasses onto the countertop and invert the cake pan onto them, positioning one in each corner of the pan. (A chiffon cake needs to hang upside down to cool or it may collapse and fall.)

Once the cake has cooled, flip it over and run a sharp, thin-bladed knife around the edge of the pan to loosen the cake from the sides. Poke holes in the cake with a skewer or point of a small, sharp knife at 1/2-inch intervals.

Prepare the soaking liquid: in a large bowl, whisk together the evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk, heavy cream and rum. Slowly pour the soaking liquid over the cake. Let it sit for a few minutes to absorb. If it’s slow to absorb, run a knife around the edges of the cake again and poke a few more holes. Place the cake in the refrigerator to chill for at least 8 hours or overnight.

Once the cake has chilled, make the glaze: in a medium microwave-safe bowl, combine the dulce de leche, rum and water. (Note: If you want a really boozy cake, change the proportions in the glaze to 3 tablespoons water and 2 tablespoons rum. You better believe this is how I made my glaze and it was superb!). Heat for 30 seconds in the microwave, then whisk to combine. Let the mixture cool to room temperature, then spread over cake. Place the cake back in the refrigerator until ready to serve. Serve with fresh fruit, if desired.

Enjoy!

Tres Leches Cake with Dulce de Leche Glaze brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

Links to Useful Kitchen Tools & Ingredients for Tres Leches Cake with Dulce de Leche Glaze:

Kitchen Aid Stand Mixer

9″x 13″x 2″ Pyrex Baking Pan

Dulce de Leche

 


Angel Food Cake with Fresh Berries & Whipped Cream

August 12, 2015

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There’s no cake that is quite as summer-y as a slice of light and spongy Angel Food cake topped with fresh sliced berries and a big ole dollop of whipped cream. That cake is so tender and moist and the berries so sweet and refreshing, it raises your mood to a more transcendental level and could almost make you forget how utterly swampy it is outside. I had never attempted to make one at home, always being somewhat intimidated for unknown reasons. Not to mention that I knew, come every May, the local grocer would have Angel Food cakes stacked nearly up to the celestial host they were named after. I rationalized my fear away by thinking -Why should I bother – it would be silly to spend all that time at home making one when I could just pick one up at the store and be done with it. Those store-bought cakes always taste pretty good right? Hmmmmm…..I thought so, until I went ahead and made one at home and found that I was definitely mistaken. Once I took a bite of a homemade Angle Food cake I realized that the store-bought ones were a bit more akin to sweetened styrofoam than I had ever known. Yup….homemade is entirely superior. And I found out that it really was not nearly as difficult to make this classic summer cake as I had previous imagined.

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Now that being said, there are a few things to keep in mind. This cake is mostly egg whites with a little flour added in to help set the structure. So you want to make sure those egg whites whip up fully. To ensure this, your mixing bowl must be clean and free from any oils and not one little bit of egg yolk can be allowed to sneak into your separated egg whites. Once the cake batter is all whipped together, you want to spoon it into a tube pan which has not been greased. The batter will cling and climb up the sides allowing it to rise higher. Once the cake has finished baking, here is the part that completely freaked me out – you have to turn it upside down and leave it inverted to cool. You see, the egg whites are the things that give this cake the rise and until they cool down, the structure is not set and could collapse under the weight of itself. Once I removed what seemed to be a perfect cake from the oven, I just stood there staring at it. I had horrible visions that the second I inverted it, it would crash out onto the counter into a big heap of crumbs. But finally I took a deep breath and just flipped it right on over. All was fine. It just hung upside down there for about 2 hours. The result was this lovely spongy texture. Moist and airy and not too sweet. Perfectly complemented by the sweet fresh berries and cream. Quite heavenly indeed! So if you find yourself with a bunch of extra egg whites this summer, like maybe after you’ve made a big old batch of ice cream, try your hand at a homemade Angel Food Cake. Dare I say you’ll find it…well, divine!

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Angel Food Cake with Fresh Berries & Whipped Cream

  • Servings: one 10 inch cake
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

recipe slightly adapted from: Completely Delicious 

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup cake flour (113 grams)
  • 1 2/3 cup (333 grams) superfine sugar, divided (can substitute granulated sugar if you don’t have superfine)
  • 1 3/4 cup egg whites (will take 12 -13 eggs depending on their size)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste (can substitute vanilla extract)
  • confectioners sugar for dusting
  • Fresh sliced berries – whatever is in season – for serving
  • Whipped Cream for topping

Directions:

Preheat oven to 300°F.

Sift the flour three times, then add 2/3 cup of the sugar and sift again.

Beat the egg whites on low-speed until frothy. Add the salt and cream of tartar and continue to beat until they just begin to form soft peaks. Slowly add the remaining sugar – only adding 2 tablespoons at a time – and beat until the egg white /sugar mixture holds soft peaks. Beat in the vanilla paste.

Here you want to work quickly, but with a gentle hand. Sift the flour mixture over the whipped egg white mixture in 4 additions, gently folding in each addition by hand until it is just incorporated before adding the next.

Spoon into an ungreased 10×4″ tube pan. Rap the pan on the counter a few times to release any bubble and smooth the top before popping it into the oven

Bake cake for approximately 1 1/4 hours, or until it is spongy to the touch and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

Here comes the scary part….If your pan is a true angel food cake pan and has little feet around the top edges, flip the pan upside down onto a flat surface and let it cool undisturbed for 2 hours. If your pan does not have feet, simply invert it over the neck of a bottle.

Once cool, use a thing knife to gently cut around the edges of the pan to release the cake.

Dust top of cake with confectioners sugar.

Slice cake with a serrated knife, using a gently sawing motion (this cake is delicate and will smoosh easily) and serve with sliced fresh berries and whipped cream.

Enjoy!

Angel Food Cake with Fresh Berries and Whipped Cream brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)


Baileys Chocolate Mud Cake

March 15, 2015

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Ummmm…did someone say Baileys and Chocolate? Sign me up! Oh how I love that combination…which you might have noticed back when I told you about those sinfully delicious Baileys & Coffee Pots de Crème.

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Well, here’s another great recipe in which Baileys and Chocolate have the starring roles, Baileys Chocolate Mud Cake.

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You might be wondering what a “mud cake” is. A mud cake is a cake that has a dense tight crumb. These cakes are usually made by melting the butter and chocolate together in a saucepan and then adding the eggs and dry ingredients to the wet ones in that same pan. A mud cake has a bit of a brownie vibe to it but still is quite definitely a cake.

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A moist, rich, decadent cake which in this case is covered with a silky smooth Baileys Chocolate ganache. Chocoholic’s bliss! Oh my….it is quite possibly a cake that could tempt St. Patrick himself!

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Baileys Chocolate Mud Cake

  • Servings: 10 - 12
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

recipe from: Citrus and Candy

Ingredients:

For the Cake:

  • 150 grams unsalted butter, chopped
  • 100 grams dark chocolate, chopped
  • 100 grams caster sugar (can substitute granulated sugar)
  • 100 grams brown sugar
  • 50 grams Dutch cocoa powder, sifted
  • 180ml Baileys Irish Cream Whiskey
  • 170 grams all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 tsps baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 3 eggs, room temperature

For the Baileys Ganache

  • 200 grams good quality dark chocolate, finely chopped
  • 200ml Baileys Irish Cream (you can do 100ml cream and 100ml Baileys if you’d rather not have some much Baileys…but I gotta ask…”What are you like?!! Of course you want it to be all Baileys!)
  • pinch of sea salt
  • 1 Tablespoon (15 grams) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature

Directions:

For the Cake:

Preheat oven to 325° F (160°C). In a pan over low heat, add the butter, chocolate, sugars, cocoa powder and Baileys. When chocolate and butter has melted, whisk together to combine making sure to get rid of any lumps of sugar or cocoa powder. Remove from heat and leave to cool for 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, grease and line an 8″ (20-21cm) round cake tin.

Sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt and set aside. Add the eggs to the slightly cooled chocolate mixture and whisk to combine. Gently fold in the sifted flour mix until free of lumps.

Scrape into cake tin then bake for about 30 -35 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean (ideally you want to see some moist crumbs stuck to it. This is one cake you don’t want to over-bake so better to be a little under than over). The top of the cake will be a little cracked but no worries, this is normal for a mud cake and you will be covering it with a lovely and oh so concealing ganache.

Remove from oven and cool in tin for 10 minutes before unmoulding and cooling completely on wire rack. Trim the tops of the cake to level (if you wish – I did not).

For the Baileys Ganache:

Place the chopped chocolate in a heatproof bowl and set aside. Bring the cream, Baileys and the salt to a simmer in a pan. Pour over the chocolate and sit for a minute. Gently stir to combine then beat in the butter.

Set aside at room temperature and cool until it is thick enough to spread over your cooled cake. Gently stir the ganache occasionally as it cools to keep the temperature even and the ganache smooth. You can just add the ganache on the top of your cake or spread it over the sides as well. Your choice.

Enjoy!

Baileys Mud Cake Brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

 

 

 

 


Upside Down Caramel Apple Cake with Whiskey Whipped Cream

March 9, 2015

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Upside Down Caramel Apple Cake with Whiskey Whipped Cream?!! Now that’s what I’m talking about! I LOVE apples, absolutely one of my favourite fruits who doesn’t love Caramel much less whiskey? This is a perfect St. Patrick’s Day dessert. After all there is a legend that St. Patrick himself planted an apple tree just outside of Armagh city.

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Apparently I am not the only one who was wild about this dessert. I have actually been calling it “Gimlet’s Fall from Grace” around the house. Our pup, Gimlet, is usually very well behaved. He “never” eats food off of the table or even coffee table. It wasn’t too long after I bragged just that about him that I was taking pictures of this cake. Luckily I had pretty much finished with the photo shoot when I was suddenly summoned to come outside. When I returned I was met at the door by a very guilty looking puppy. When I raised my gaze over to the coffee table where I take most of my photos, what did I see but my beautiful Upside Down Caramel Apple Cake with a big old chomp taken right out of it! What the what! This dog never messes up!  We have left cheese and crackers and sausage on that table over night and he didn’t even give it a second look. Well…I guess that isn’t entirely true. He did succumb to temptation once before. Yup….that time it was a Banana Rum Muffin that did him in. Well, I assure you I tried to be all stern and outraged, telling him what a BAD dog he was, but I have to admit, it was pretty amusing.

How could you be mad at this adorable little face?

How could you be mad at this adorable little face?

And I think a great testimony to how irresistible this Upside Down Caramel Apple Cake truly is.

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I must admit, when I turned that cake over onto the serving platter and saw that rush of molten, gooey caramel pouring down over the cake, I found it a bit difficult to contain myself as well. My first urge was to just take a big old bite right out of the side of it. So I guess I’ll have to give poor Gimlet a break…afterall, he’s only human…

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Upside Down Caramel Apple Cake with Whiskey Whipped Cream

  • Servings: 10 -12 slices
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

recipe inspired by: epicurean

Ingredients:

For the Caramel:

  • 1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 8 oz. heavy whipping cream, divided

For the Cake:

  • 2 apples – one sliced into thin wedges, one chopped into 1/2″ – 1″ cubes.
  • 1 1/3 cup flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1/2 cup plus 1 Tablespoon superfine sugar (caster sugar)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 – 2 Tablespoons milk

Whiskey Whipped Cream:

  • Remaining whipped cream
  • 2 Tablespoons confectioner’s sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons Irish Whiskey
  • Caramel Sauce for Drizzle (can use store bought or if you are feeling industrious, whip up a batch of my Perfect Salted Caramel Sauce.)

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350° F. Grease a 9 inch round cake pan and set aside.

In small sauce pan over low heat, combine brown sugar, butter and 2 Tablespoons of the whipping cream. Cook and stir until the butter and sugar are melted. Pour caramel into the bottom of the prepared 9″ cake pan. Arrange apple slices in concentric circles on top of caramel. Set aside.

Combine flour, baking powder, cinnamon and salt in bowl. Whisk together. Set aside.

In the bowl of a stand mixer combine butter and superfine sugar. Beat until light and fluffy. Add the eggs 1 at a time, mixing until egg is fully incorporated before adding the next.

Fold in 1/2 the flour mixture, mixing only until just combined. Then add the other 1/2 of the flour mixture and milk. Gently fold in the cubed apple.

Carefully spoon the batter over the caramel/apple mixture in the 9″ cake pan. Bake for 40 -50 minutes, or until toothpick inserted into center comes out clean.

Cool for 2 -3 minutes on a wire rack and then carefully invert the cake onto a serving plate.

Just prior to serving, beat the remaining whipping cream until soft peaks form. Add the powdered sugar and whiskey. Beat until stiff peak form. Dollop over cake slices as they are served.

Enjoy!

Upside Down Caramel Apple Cake with Whiskey Whipped Cream brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)


Banana Yellowman Bundt Cake

March 4, 2015

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Banana Yellowman Cake…Wow! The recipes have great eye-catching names this year. Chicken Skink yesterday and now Banana Yellowman. So what is a Banana Yellowman Cake? Well, it is a delicious moist banana cake that is shot through with little sticky nuggets of Yellowman and glazed with a caramel frosting. But what is Yellowman? Oh, right, unless you’re from Ireland, the term is probably not one you are familiar with. Yellowman is what Honeycomb is called in Ireland. It is also known as Cinder Toffee in Britain and Hokey Pokey in New Zealand and Cornwall. (I was tempted to call this cake a Hokey Pokey Cake because after I took one bite I was fairly certain that this cake could be “what it’s all about”, but since I’m including it in the St. Patrick’s Day countdown, I decided to go with “yellowman”). So, Yellowman is that yellow or golden sugary toffee with a crunchy sponge-like texture. You’ve maybe seen it in the middle of a Crunchie candy bar.

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I’m not sure if you can just go out and buy it in a shop, but the good news is that it is very easy and fun to make. And if you have kids, they can help out and get a quick chemistry lesson as well. You see the reaction between the vinegar and the baking soda produces carbon dioxide gas, which gives the Yellowman its bubbly, crunchy consistency.

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The reaction is quite dramatic  once that baking soda is added. Seriously it foams up to about 4x its original size, so make sure you are using a deep pan. And do exercise caution because you have to heat it to 300°F (150°C) before you add that baking soda, so there is potential there for some serious burns. Once you have a batch of Yellowman made up, you can use some of it in this cake, of course, but you can also dip it in chocolate for a great treat all on its own, or crumble it over ice cream.

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I first came across this recipe on a great blog from the West of Ireland, Warm & Snug & Fat. The husband has never met a banana dessert he didn’t like, so I knew this cake would be a winner. And I am often looking for a way to use up bananas that have crossed over that thin line of ripe enough to way too ripe. This cake takes care of four of those types of casualties. After the Yellowman has been made, the cake comes together quickly and easily. And boy does it deliver on taste. Moist, tender, very notable banana flavour and when you get a bite with one of those bonus golden nuggets of goodness, it is pure bliss.

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This cake would be just fine without the frosting, but the frosting really puts it over the top and provides something to which even more of that crumbled Yellowman can cling on to. And as far as Yellowman is concerned, the more the merrier!

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Banana Yellowman Bundt Cake

  • Servings: 1 bundt cake
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

recipe from: Warm & Snug & Fat

Ingredients:

For the cake:

  • 225 grams (8oz) plain flour
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 heaped tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 110 grams (4oz) caster sugar (can substitute granulated sugar)
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 75 grams (3oz) butter, melted
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract
  • 65 grams (2½ oz) yellowman/ honeycomb, smashed (recipe for yellowman/honeycomb below)
  • 4 medium-sized ripe bananas, mashed

For the caramel frosting:

  • 115 grams butter
  • 115 grams light muscovado sugar
  • 140 ml heavy cream

Directions:

 Sift the flour, salt, baking powder and cinnamon into a bowl and stir in the sugar.

Mix in the egg, melted butter and vanilla but do not beat.

Fold in the honeycomb and mashed bananas, using a fork. Again, do not beat.

Spoon into a buttered and floured bundt tin or lined (3½ inch x 8 inch) 900 gram/2lb loaf tin and bake in an oven preheated to 350° F ( 180° C, gas mark 4) for 50-60 minutes, until the cake is golden brown and springs back when prodded gently with your finger.

Leave in the tin for 10 minutes, then turn onto a wire rack to cool.

Once cake is completely cool, drizzle caramel frosting over the top. You can also add some extra crumbled honeycomb to garnish.

Enjoy!

Yellowman, Honeycomb, Cinder toffee, Hokey Pokey

recipe from: Nigella.com

Ingredients:

  • 100 grams caster sugar (can substitute granulated, but you should probably give it a couple of pulses in the food processor to make the sugar “superfine”)
  • tablespoons Lyle’s golden syrup
  • 1 ½ teaspoons bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
  • 25 ml water

Directions:

Put the sugar and syrup into a saucepan and stir together to mix. If you notice that sugar is clinging to the sides of the pan, you can paint the sides with a pastry brush dipped in water. Once you turn on the heat, it is very important that you do not touch it! That’s right, no stirring.

Place the pan on the heat and let the mixture first melt. Continue watching the pan closely. You will notice that it will liquefy and then turn a dark amber color. It should reach a temperature of 150°C/300°F. Or you can drop a bit of it in a small bowl of water and if it forms a hard ball when it hits the water, it is done. I think the thermometer version is easier. It will take about 3 minutes or so, depending on how high you have the heat.

Take the pan off the heat, whisk in the bicarbonate of soda. Take care because the mixture will bubble up crazily, like a volcano comes to mind. Turn this immediately onto a piece of baking parchment or greased foil. Don’t try to smooth it out. Just pour it and leave it alone.

Once it has cooled, smash it will a rolling pin or hammer so that it splinters into many pieces.

Store in a air-tight bowl.

Banana Yellow Bundt Cake brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

 


Dundee Cake with Hot Whisky Marmalade

January 20, 2015

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O.k. It seems like corks were just popping on New Year’s Eve and BAM...next thing I know we’ve nearly reached the end of January! Indeed the 25th will be happening this Sunday. So what is the significance of January 25th you might ask. Well, throughout the world, though especially in Scotland, folks will be celebrating with a Burns Night Supper to mark the occasion. Robert Burns, who is regarded as the National Poet of Scotland, was born on that day in 1759. I’m quite a Burns fan myself and will certainly be raising my glass to The Bard this weekend. I have given you some great Scottish recipes in the past in case you might be planning a Burn’s Night Supper of you own. Last year it was Scotch Egg Pie, which is a type of meat pie that has spicy sausage surrounding an inner circle of hard-boiled eggs all wrapped up in a buttery flaky pie crust.

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The year before I shared Cock-a-leekie soup

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 which I served with delicious, crusty Struan. Struan, also known as Celtic Harvest Bread, is thought to have taken its name from a town in Western Scotland called Struanmoor, on the Isle of Skye. It was originally enjoyed once a year as a harvest bread, using whatever grains were available from the previous day’s harvest. This is my absolute favourite bread, so it is almost always available in my house. It toasts up particularly brilliantly.

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The year before that it was Deviled Scotch Eggs.

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And I had also previously given you the traditional Scotch Egg recipe. If you don’t know what Scotch Eggs are, believe me it is time that you find out! Basically it is  a hard-boiled egg encased in sausage and then deep-fried. Good Lord Have Mercy!

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So I have already set the bar pretty high for myself when it comes to Scottish delicacies for your Burn’s Night Supper. Nevertheless, I think I’ve risen to the challenge yet again. This year I’m going to turn my attention from the savory to the sweet. I’ve got a great Scottish dessert I’d like to share with you, Dundee Cake with Hot Whisky Marmalade Sauce. Now I bet that’s got you drooling huh?

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Dundee Cake is a famous traditional Scottish fruit cake which hales from…bet you guessed it already huh? Yup…Dundee. You see, there is a famous marmalade company, Keiller’s, which is located in Dundee and they are credited with developing this recipe in the 19th Century. Actually, there is a chance that although they popularized this cake at that time, the recipe is much older, dating back to the 16th century perhaps. The legend goes that Mary Queen of Scots did not like glace cherries in her cakes. I can’t say I blame her. I think those things are quite suspicious to say the least. So the classic fruit cake recipe was somewhat altered for her and a cake was made without the usual cherries, but with blanched almonds instead.

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Dundee Cake is often served at Christmas time throughout the British Isles, but definitely in Scotland. Indeed, recently the town of Dundee has put in a bid to have Dundee Cake awarded a Protected Geographical Indicator Status from the European Commission. That will prevent anyone who is not from Dundee from selling a cake labeled as Dundee Cake. You know, it is like Champagne. Champagne is only bottled in Champagne France. If it is produced in any other locale, it is not Champagne and needs to be called Sparkling wine. If the Dundee Cake is awarded PGI status, consumers will have 100% guarantee of its authenticity and confidence that they will enjoy all of the unique characteristics that have long been associated with this type of cake traditionally made in Dundee.

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So what is this cake like? Well, it is delicious of course! And don’t even start raising your eyebrows and giving me that “are you kidding me… it is a fruit cake” kind of face. Unlike many fruitcakes you might have encountered in the past that were most likely used as a door stop rather than eaten, this cake is light and buttery with a touch spice and warm citrus notes. Not to mention that it is chock full of juicy, whisky soaked fruit and festooned with circles of almonds.

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Notice I spelled whisky properly here. When referring to Scotch, there is no “e” in whisky. And speaking of whisky, don’t forget that each slice of this moist, rich cake should be served with a generous pour of Hot Whiskey Marmalade Sauce and topped with a dollop of whipped cream. Yum! It will change everything you thought you knew about fruitcakes! I hope I have inspired you to host a Burns Night Supper of your own or at least to raise a wee dram and drink a toast to Scotland’s Favourite Son this Sunday.

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Dundee Cake with Hot Whisky Marmalade Sauce

  • Servings: one 8 inch cake
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

recipe slightly adapted from: Epicurious

Ingredients:

For the Cake:

  • 1 3/4 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice*
  • 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons Scotch whisky (plus more for soaking fruit)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons grated orange peel
  • 3 large eggs
  • 3/4 cup golden raisins
  • 3/4 cup dark raisins
  • 3/4 cup dried currants
  • 1/3 cup chopped candied orange peel (I used mixed candied peel from King Arthur Flour)
  • 2 tablespoons orange marmalade
  • Whole blanched almonds (Can’t find pre-blanched almonds in the store? No problem. See instructions below**.)

For the Hot Whisky Sauce:

  • 2/3 cup orange marmalade
  • 3 tablespoons whisky
  • 4 oranges

Freshly whipped cream for serving.

Directions:

For the cake:

The night prior to baking, place the raisins and currants in a bowl. Pour enough whisky over fruit to cover it. Allow fruit to soak overnight. This is an optional step, but I believe that it not only allows the fruit to plump up a bit, but it gives it a wonderful boozy flavour!

Preheat oven to 300°F. Butter 8-inch-diameter cake pan with 2-inch-high sides; line bottom with parchment paper. You could also use a springform pan or if your 8″ cake round does not have 2″ high sides, line the sides with parchment paper to gain the 2″ height. Sift flour, baking powder, salt, and spice into medium bowl. Using electric mixer, beat butter, sugar, whisky, and grated orange peel in large bowl until fluffy. Beat in eggs 1 at a time. Stir in dry ingredients, then all dried fruits and candied peel. Transfer batter to prepared pan.

Bake cake 1 hour. Remove cake from oven. Brush top with 2 tablespoons marmalade. Arrange almonds around edge, pressing lightly to adhere. Bake cake until tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 20 minutes longer. Cool cake completely in pan on rack. (Can be made 3 days ahead. Cover; store at room temperature.) Turn cake out of pan; peel off parchment. Place upright on plate.

For the Whisky Sauce:

Combine marmalade and whisky in medium saucepan. Cut all peel and white pith from oranges. Working over bowl to catch juices, cut between membranes, releasing orange segments. Add 2 tablespoons orange juice from bowl to saucepan. Stir over medium-low heat until marmalade melts and sauce is heated through, about 5 minutes. Transfer sauce to serving bowl.

Serve cake with warm sauce, orange segments, and whipped cream.

Enjoy!

Dundee Cake with Hot Whisky Marmalade Sauce brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

*Don’t have pumpkin pie spice?: Pumpkin pie spice is a combination of mostly cinnamon, with some ginger, allspice and nutmeg added into the mix. This recipe only calls for 1/8 tsp. of the spice. You could just add a dash of the above spices and call it a day.

**How to blanch almonds: Take raw unsalted almonds and drop them in boiling water. Allow them to boil for 60 seconds, but no longer. Remove almonds to a colander and rinse them with cold water. Blot them dry with a paper towel. The skins can easily be removed at this point by simply squeezing the almond between your fingers. Let the almonds dry entirely. Voila! You now have blanched almonds ready to use in this recipe.


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