Colcannon (Cál Ceannann)

March 12, 2016

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Ahhhh….Colcannon! Irish Comfort food at its finest! I can’t believe in all my years of St. Patrick’s Day blogging I haven’t shared this recipe. For those of you who might be unfamiliar with this dish, it is buttery mashed potatoes whipped up with cabbage, leeks and bacon. OMG right?!!! With that list of outstanding ingredients, you just know it is going to be to die for.

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Colcannon or Cál Ceannann in Irish simply means white-headed cabbage. There are many regional variations on this dish, sometimes ham is used rather than bacon, sometimes you’ll find spring onions included rather than leeks. Indeed, I was rather horrified to discover that some peculiar folks will use kale rather than cabbage. This is disturbing to me for a couple of reasons. First off, the dish’s actual name is the word for cabbage, so….

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And then of course, I hate kale. Yup…hate it. I know it is good for me. However, I find it bitter and evil. In fact the mere thought of kale inspires this same look I have when I find caraway seeds in my soda bread.

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I’m flexible on swapping around some of the other ingredients in my Colcannon, though I do believe that leeks, cabbage and bacon are supreme. But, please… don’t get that nasty old kale anywhere near my Colcannon! Anyhoo…In Ireland, Colcannon is traditionally served on Halloween. It is a bit like Barmbrack that I just recently told you about, in that it was used in Halloween divination rituals. Several charms or trinkets, such as a ring, thimble or coins would be stirred into the Colcannon before it was served. The item you ended up with on your plate would tell your fortune. (i.e.. if you got a ring, you would be married before the year was through.) In the 1800’s, Irish immigrants brought this recipe with them to the United States and Colcannon came to be associated more with St. Patrick’s Day, rather than Halloween. I can definitely say, for me, Colcannon is great any time of the year. Sheer Comfort Food perfection!

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Colcannon (Cál Ceannann)

  • Servings: 6 -8
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

recipe slightly adapted from: Williams Sonoma

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 lb. potatoes, peeled and quartered
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 8 Tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter
  • 3/4 cup milk (or cream if you are feeling particularly decadent)
  • 4 bacon slices, cut into 1/2-inch dice
  • 2 large leeks, white and light green portions,
    halved lengthwise, rinsed well and thinly sliced
  • 1/2 small head cabbage, about 1 lb., cored
    and coarsely chopped
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

Directions:

Put the potatoes in a large pot, add water to cover the potatoes by 2 inches and generously salt the water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, reduce the heat to medium and cook until the potatoes are tender when pierced with a knife, about 15 minutes. Drain well in a colander.

Meanwhile, in a small saucepan over low heat, combine the butter and milk and heat until the butter melts and the mixture is hot, 8 to 10 minutes.

Set a potato ricer over the bowl of a stand mixer and press the potatoes through in batches. Mix in the milk mixture in two additions. Season with salt and pepper. Cover the bowl with aluminum foil and set over a large saucepan of barely simmering water to keep warm.

Heat a heavy pot or Dutch oven over medium heat until hot. Add the bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, until browned and crisp, about 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the bacon to a paper towel-lined plate. Set aside.

Pour off all but 3 Tablespoons of the fat from the pot. Return the pot to medium heat, add the leeks and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the cabbage and toss until tender-crisp, about 8 minutes. Sprinkle with freshly ground nutmeg and the bacon, and season with salt and pepper. Stir the potatoes into the cabbage mixture and serve warm.

Enjoy!

Colcannon brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

Links to Useful Kitchen Tools & Ingredients for Colcannon:

Kitchen Aid Stand Mixer

Potato Ricer

 


Irish Pizza with Corned Beef, Leeks, Crispy Potato & Irish Cheddar

March 11, 2016

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I don’t know about you, but around here, we love pizza, especially Neapolitan style thin-crust pizzas. And we have definitely gotten into making our own pies here at home. We’ve slowly collected all the gear to use on Pizza Night; the pizza stone for baking, pizza paddles for transferring it to the oven, and quite a few of the pizza specialty flours from King Arthur Flour. We love experimenting with different toppings as well as crusts. So finding myself with a bit of left over corned beef and taking some inspiration from an Irish Pizza I saw over at Lexi Bites blog, we decided to make our own version of an Irish Pizza. This Hibernian gem has a thin Guinness infused pizza crust which is topped with shredded corned beef, leeks, crispy potatoes, thyme and Irish Cheddar. Rather than a red sauce, I used leftover Horseradish Cream Sauce which I usually serve with my annual St. Patrick’s Day Corned Beef feast. What a tasty pie!

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I will take this opportunity to give you a wee bit of advice on the making of a thin crust pizza though. The absolute most difficult thing we’ve encountered in all our pizza making endeavors is simply not overloading the crust. Man is that hard! I mean, you’ve got all these delicious toppings just sitting there right? If a little is good, more has to be better…Not true! Tons of toppings will quickly weigh down a thing crust pizza, making it nearly impossible to transfer from the pizza paddle onto the stone and will often make the crust soggy. So you must exercise restraint here! And if you really don’t think you’d be into making your own pizza dough, I get it. You can run out and get a store-bought crust and proceed with the Irish-y toppings. It’s a great way to use up some leftovers. Pour a few pints and get busy…bet you’ll have some fun and have a tasty meal to boot!

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Irish Pizza with Corned Beef, Leeks, Crispy Potatoes & Irish Cheddar

  • Servings: makes 2 - 10 inch pizzas
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Recipes adapted from: King Arthur Flour (for the Guinness Pizza Crust), & Lexi Bites (pizza topping inspiration)

Ingredients:

For the Ultra-Thin Guinness Pizza Crust:

  • 3 Cups (372 grams) King Arthur Flour Perfect Pizza Blend flour ( or can substitute in 1 1/2 cup all-purpose flour, 1 cup semolina flour & 1/2 cup durum flour)
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 – 1 1/4 cups warm (98° – 110° F, 37°C) Guinness Stout (you can substitute water in place of the Guinness if you wish, though I’m not sure why you would…)

For the Pizza Toppings:

  • 1 – 1 1/2 cups leftover corned beef, shredded or cut into smaller pieces
  • 4 leeks, thinly sliced and sautéed in butter until softened
  • 1/3 cup Horseradish Cream Sauce (recipe to follow) if you don’t like horseradish, substitute plain sour cream
  • 1 cup hash browns, cooked until crispy
  • 3/4 cup mozzarella cheese, shredded
  • 3/4 cup Irish Cheddar, shredded
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh thyme, leaves only, chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh chives, chopped

Directions:

Combine the dry ingredients, oil, and 1 cup of Guinness, mixing and kneading everything together by hand, mixer or bread machine set on the dough cycle until you’ve made a soft, smooth dough. The dough should be soft and supple; adjust with additional Guinness or flour if needed. If you’re kneading in a stand mixer, it should take 4 to 5 minutes at second speed, and the dough should barely clean the sides of the bowl, perhaps sticking a bit at the bottom.

Place the dough in a dough rising bucket, or large bowl, lightly covered with plastic wrap, and let it rise at room temperature for 60 to 90 minutes, or until it begins to look puffy. In the meantime, preheat the oven to 425°F. If you are using a baking stone to bake the pizza on, place it into the oven at this time.

While the dough is rising, prepare all of your toppings; chop the leftover corned beef, sauté the leeks and set them aside to cool, cook the hash browns until crispy and set aside to cool, grate the cheese, chop the thyme and chives, mix up the Horseradish Cream Sauce. (recipe noted below).

Once the dough has risen, divide it into two equal portions and place each on a lightly oiled 12″ pizza pan, or on parchment paper lightly spritzed with cooking spray. 

Use your fingers to press the dough outward from the center to make a very thin, flat circle about 12″ across. 

Spread the toppings over the dough, keeping in mind not to overload the thin crust. Hold the chives aside to sprinkle over the pizzas once they are out of the oven

Bake for 12 – 15 minutes, or until crust is golden brown and cheese is hot and bubbly.

Top with chives and serve immediately.

Enjoy!

Horseradish Cream Sauce

This recipe will make far more sauce than you need for your pizza’s. However, it is delicious to have on hand to eat with any leftover corned beef and/or potatoes. It is also great on the Colcannon Skillet Cakes.

Recipe adapted from: Bon Appetit

Yield: 1 1/2 cups

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 6 tablespoons prepared white horseradish (about 4 ounces)
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh chives or green onion tops

Directions:

Whisk all ingredients in small bowl to blend. Cover and refrigerate at least 2 hours. DO AHEAD: Can be made 2 days ahead. Keep refrigerated.

Irish Pizza brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

Helpful Links to Kitchen Tools & Ingredients for Irish Pizza:

Kitchen Aid Stand Mixer

Thermoworks Super-Fast Thermapen Cooking Thermometer

6 Quart Dough Rising Bucket

SAF Instant Yeast

Emile Henry Flame Top Pizza Stone

King Arthur Flour Perfect Pizza Blend Flour

 

 

 


Guinness Pistachio Sweet Rolls with Baileys Cream Cheese Frosting

March 10, 2016

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So…here we are…The Sixth Day of my St. Patrick’s Day blog-a-thon. And today, not only am I sharing a mouthwateringly amazing recipe for Guinness Pistachio Sweet Rolls with Baileys Cream Cheese Frosting, but things are really getting ready to heat up here in my kitchen. That’s right, a veritable Irish-y recipe blitz is now underway. Up until today I had posting every other day, but from now until St. Patrick’s Day, March 17th, you’ll hear from me every day. Seven more delicious recipes coming to you in rapid fire succession! I hope you’ll be checking back in. But let’s not lose sight of the deliciousness before us today in these Guinness Pistachio Sweet Rolls with Baileys Cream Cheese Frosting. What we’ve got here is a lovely sweet Guinness infused yeasted dough which has been filled with buttery brown sugar and pistachios and frosted with a Baileys Cream Cheese Frosting. They’re soft, fluffy, sticky, boozy perfection I tell you.

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I first saw this recipe over at the Blahnik Baker site and just knew I had to make it. I use a slightly different recipe and technique for making the dough than she does. I rely on yeast for all the rise whereas she uses a bit of baking soda and powder as well. Looks interesting, but I was pretty comfortable with the way I knew to do yeast dough, so you know that saying about old dogs and new tricks…I went with what I knew and was very happy with the results.

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As was the Husband. He calls these little gems “Guinness Sticky Buns” rather than their rather long-winded name. In fact, I considered changing the recipe title to that, but found out that Sticky Buns are actually different from what we have here. A true sticky bun is made by lining the baking tin with syrup, honey and nuts before the dough is placed on top. Once it has baked it is inverted so that the lining becomes a sticky topping. Sounds delicious as well, but that isn’t what we have here, so Guinness Pistachio Sweet Rolls it remains (except in this house where Guinness Sticky Buns stubbornly persists).

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It really doesn’t matter what you call them, just make sure you bake up a batch for an extra special St. Patrick’s Day breakfast treat. After all, there’s nothing like a little Guinness & Baileys to get your busy day of celebrations off to a great start!

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Guinness Pistachio Sweet Rolls with Baileys Cream Cheese Frosting

  • Servings: 16 rolls
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

recipe inspired by: Blahnik Baker

Ingredients:

For the Rolls:

  • 1 ½ cups whole milk
  • ½ cup Guinness draft beer
  • ½ cup coconut oil
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • 4 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 5 cups all-purpose flour (+ a bit more as needed)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt

For the filling:

  • ½ cup butter
  • ¾ cup brown sugar
  • ¾ cup shelled pistachios, chopped

For the Frosting:

  • 4 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
  • ¼ cup milk
  • 2 tablespoon Baileys Irish Cream, or more to taste
  • ½ to 1 cup confectioner’s sugar

Directions:

For the Rolls:

In a large saucepan, heat the milk, Guinness, oil and granulated sugar over medium heat to just below a boil.

Remove the pan from heat. Transfer the mixture to the bowl of a stand mixer and allow it to cool to warm (98° – 105° F). Once the milk/Guinness mixture has cooled, sprinkle the yeast over the top and let it sit for 5 minutes. It should look foamy once time is up.

With the mixer running on its lowest speed, start to add the flour 1 cup at a time until the dough starts to pull away from the side of the bowl.

Scrape the dough down and allow it to rest for 5 minutes to fully hydrate the flour. Switch to the dough hook attachment and knead for 6 minutes.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured counter. Shape it into a ball and place it into a lightly oiled dough rising bucket (or large bowl). Cover with plastic wrap and set in a warm spot to rise until it is doubled, approximately 1 hour (could be more or less depending on how warm your kitchen is.) At this point you can proceed with baking or place the dough in the refrigerator over night.

Once you are ready to bake, preheat the oven to 375° F. Lightly oil two 9″ pie plates, or cake pans. I had 3 buns which did not fit into my pie pans, so I also used a small 6″ cast iron skillet. You could actually also bake 1/2 of the rolls in a large 9 -10″ cast iron skillet if you prefer.

Assembly:

Remove the dough from bucket and gently deflate. Weigh the dough and divide it in half.

Place the first half dough ball on a silicone pastry mat or lightly floured kitchen counter. Roll it out to a rectangle, measuring about 12 x 8 inches. Paint the melted butter over the dough using a pastry brush. Leave a 1/2″ margin on all sides unbuttered. Sprinkle half of the brown sugar and then half of the pistachios over the melted butter. To roll, start at the end farthest away from you and roll the rectangle towards you. Use both hands and roll tightly. Finish with the seam side down, pinching together any loose ends and rolling back and forth several times on the counter.

Using a sharp knife (or long strand of unflavored dental floss) gently cut the dough into 1 1/4 – 1 1/2″ slices and arrange them in the prepared baking tins.

Repeat this process for the second half of the dough.

Cover the baking tins with plastic wrap and allow the rolls to rise until they look puffy – approximately 30 minutes – 1 hour.

Remove the plastic wrap and place the buns in the preheated oven. Bake for 20 -22 minutes or until golden and bubbling.

Remove from oven to cooling rack and let cool for 10 -15 minutes.

For the frosting:

Prepare the Baileys frosting while the rolls are baking. Place the room temperature cream cheese in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Add the milk and the Baileys and mixing until smooth. Slowly (like 1 tablespoon at a time) add the confectioner’s sugar. Wait until the first tablespoon has thoroughly mixed in before adding the second. Continue to add confectioner’s sugar until the frosting reaches the desired consistency.

Load frosting into a pastry bag fitted with round tip. Pipe over warm rolls. (You can also just use a spatula to spread the frosting over the top of all of the rolls, as you wish.)

Serve warm.

Enjoy!

Guinness Pistachio Sweet Rolls with Baileys Cream Cheese Frosting brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

Links to Useful Kitchen Tools & Ingredients for Guinness Pistachio Sweet Rolls:

Le Creuset Enameled Cast Iron Sauce Pan

Thermoworks Super-Fast Thermapen Cooking Thermometer

Kitchen Aid Artisan Stand Mixer

6 Quart Dough Rising Bucket

Norpro Silicone Pastry Mat

SAF Instant Yeast

Le Creuset 9″ Stoneware Pie Dish

Le Creuset 6 1/3″ Cast Iron Frying Pan

 


Two loaves of Barmbrack (Báirín Breac) Bread – A Yeasted Barmbrack & A Tea Loaf with Whiskey Honey Butter Glaze

March 9, 2016

 

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Here we are, March 9th and I’ve already shared 4 Irish-y recipes here in this lead up to St. Patrick’s Day. Today I’ve got a twofer for you. I’m actually going to remind you of two recipes I posted back in October for Barmbrack. Barmbrack is a traditional Halloween treat in Ireland, so I told you all about it back then. But it would certainly be very welcome on any St. Patrick’s Day table as well. Not to mention, I needed a bit of a breather before my blog-a-thon starts to pick up speed. Yup….starting tomorrow I am going to share one new recipe a day all the way to March 17th! A veritable blitz of dishes I tell you. But for now, back to that Barmbrack I just mentioned.

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Barmbrack is also known as Báirín Breac in Irish. Breac means “speckled” which this bread definitely is, being shot through with a variety of fruit. Báirín can either be the word for “loaf” which would make sense since that would make its name be “speckled loaf” in English. However, I’ve also come across the theory that Barm is derived from the word “beorma”, which refers to a fermented liquor which would have been used back in the day to rise the cake. Barmbrack loaves were traditionally baked up on Halloween as part of an ancient fortune-telling ritual. Yup. Several different trinkets or charms (perhaps the origin of that “lucky charm” bit…) were wrapped in parchment paper and baked  into the bread. When the bread was sliced and handed out, your future was foretold by whatever bit you found in your portion. A wedding ring meant you’d be married within the year, a pea meant that you would not, a coin signified wealth, whereas a piece of rag meant a lean year, a thimble predicted a spinster and button meant bachelorhood was in your future. Back in October, when I first set out to make Barmbrack, I quickly discovered that there were two different types of the bread to be found, a yeasted version and a non-yeasted version which was more like a tea bread. I couldn’t decide which one to make, so I did a loaf of each. I found the yeasted version to be light, airy, slightly sweet and spicy (in a nutmeg/cinnamon/clove kind of way – not my usual set your tongue alight kind of way.) It was chock full of whiskey & tea soaked raisins, sultanas and cranberries. Lovely still warm from the oven, it was even better I think when toasted and slathered in butter!

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The second Brack I made was a Tea Barmbrack, which is a rich, dense loaf similar to a fruitcake. But not one of those yucky things some great Aunt sends you at Christmas. No sir-ee, this crave worthy loaf will completely erase all of your pre-conceived fruitcake notions with just one delectable bite. This Tea Barmbrack is full of boozy soaked raisins, sultanas, currants and dates. And it has that Whiskey Honey Butter Glaze. Pure ambrosia I tell you! One taste and you will be hooked!

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So which one should you choose? That’s a hard one. I thought they both were pretty scrumptious. The yeasted one takes a little longer to make when you factor in all of the rise times, but if you love yeast bread, that might be your winner. The Tea Barmbrack is a one bowl wonder and doesn’t require any rise times. Hmmm…decisions, decisions. Rest assured there is no wrong choice. They are both winners and will be a great complement to your St. Patrick’s Day table.

Get the Recipe for Barmbrack Bread (Yeasted Version)

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Get the Recipe for Tea Barmbrack with a Whiskey Honey Butter Glaze

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Enjoy!

Stay tuned tomorrow for a brand spanking new recipe for Guinness Pistachio Sweet Rolls with Baileys Cream Cheese Frosting. Bet that’s got you drooling!


Baileys & Coffee Macarons

March 7, 2016

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Wow! This year’s St. Patrick’s Day recipes have been quite surprising for me. I’ve actually gone outside my culinary comfort zone with a couple of these and it has been a success. I told you how I’d approached that Irish Cheddar & Thyme Potato Soufflé with much trepidation. And lo and behold all was fine. Well, I was the same way about Macarons. Although I love them, I felt that I would just have to resign myself to purchase them in bakeries. I was convinced that if I were to try them at home, what with their reputation for being so notoriously finicky and sensitive, I was already doomed to fail. But look what I’ve got here for you today…Baileys & Coffee Macarons.

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And I swear to you, I did actually bake these. There was no cheating and buying them in a bakery and then taking pictures of them (not that I would even consider doing such a thing…) I made these all by my lonesome!

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Well, all by my lonesome along with some great tips and advice from Olivia at Liv for Cake. (You simply must take a look at her scrumptious blog!) Now, I won’t fib to you and say that making Macarons is easy-peasy. But it wasn’t a nightmare either. They key is you must follow directions to a T. There is no room for any slap/dash cooks here. An accurate kitchen scale is a must as well. There can be no short cuts, no skipping steps. If you can do this, you will be rewarded big time!

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These little gems are crisp on the outside, chewy on the inside and filled with irresistible Baileys & Coffee flavors. Soooo worth the effort. These Baileys & Coffee Macarons are to die for I tell you! They will be a big hit at your St. Patrick’s Day fête and folks will think you’re quite the chef!

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Baileys & Coffee Macarons

  • Servings: 20 -25 macarons
  • Difficulty: moderate - you must follow instructions closely
  • Print

recipe from: Liv for Cake

Ingredients:

For the cookies:

  • 120 grams egg whites (the whites from 4 large eggs), room temperature
  • 130 grams (4.6 oz) caster sugar
  • 140 grams (4.9 oz.) almond powder (also called almond flour)
  • 110 grams (3.9 oz.) icing sugar
  • 2 teaspoons espresso powder

For the ganache:

  • 200 grams milk chocolate
  • 100 grams heavy cream
  • 20 grams Baileys

Directions:

Line baking sheets with parchment paper. Make a template for the macarons by tracing the outline of a 1 1/2″ cookie cutter. Once you have all of your circles drawn, flip the parchment paper over so that the ink/pencil does not transfer to the cookie. (Be sure to take a look at my helpful links below. There is a link for a silicone baking mat specially made for macarons, with the templates already printed on the mat!)

Place the almond powder, icing sugar, and espresso powder in a food processor. Process until just beginning to clump.

Sift and discard any bits that won’t pass through the sifter. Set aside.

Make sure the bowl of your stand mixer as well as the whisk attachment are clean and free of any oil or grease. If any is present you will not be successful when you attempt to make the meringue peak. Also take care that no tiny bit of yolk has made its way into the whites. Its presence will also doom a meringue.

Whip the egg whites until they’re the consistency of a loose foam. Continue whipping while slowly adding sugar. Whip to a stiff meringue.

Fold the dry mixture into the meringue. In order to achieve the proper consistency, you will need to fold the batter many times. Once the batter is ready it will be smooth and shiny and will run in a steady stream off a spatula to settle back into the batter.

Pour the batter into a piping bag fitted with the 1A tip.

Pipe the batter onto the templated baking sheet.

Once all of the macarons are piped, whack the baking sheet on the counter at least 3 times to get rid of any air bubbles.

Let the macarons dry at room temperature until dry to the touch. Approx 1 hour. DO NOT skip this step.

While macarons are drying, make the ganache.

Chop the chocolate finely and place in a bowl. Heat the cream until boiling and pour over chopped chocolate. Do not stir! Cover bowl with plastic wrap for 2 mins. Stir to combine and add Baileys. Place in fridge to set.

Once dry, bake macarons in a 300°F oven until they stick a little bit to the parchment, about 12 minutes.

Let cookies cool completely before gently removing from pans.

Pipe ganache into the center of one cookie, sandwich with another of the cookies and twist together. Let Macarons chill and age in the refrigerator overnight. They will taste even more amazing when the filling and the shells bond and blend together.

Enjoy!

Baileys & Coffee Macarons brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

Helpful Links to Kitchen Tools & Ingredients for Baileys & Coffee Macarons:

Oxo Good Grips Stainless Steel Food Scale

Cuisinart Food Processor

Kitchen Aid Stand Mixer

Simple Baker Silicone Baking Mat for Macarons – I know I told you how to trace out a template for your Macarons on parchment paper, but here you have a silicone mat where it is done for you! I have already ordered one for myself!

Ateco 11 piece Plain Round Cookie Cutter Set

Oxo 3-in-1 Egg Separator

King Arthur Flour Almond Flour

Domino White Superfine Sugar (caster sugar)

 


Irish Cheddar & Thyme Potato Soufflés

March 5, 2016

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Wow! Look what I’ve got here for you today…Irish Cheddar & Thyme Potato Soufflés! Sounds quite posh huh? I must admit, that is certainly the vibe I got when I heard someone talk about a soufflé. I thought soufflés were a bit too fancy for me and I was, in all honesty, much too nervous to attempt to make one. I mean I had spent my whole childhood watching cartoons which often showed some poor soul slaving over a soufflé all day just to have it collapse after some surprising loud noise occurred. Nah…not for me. Those soufflé things just sounded too persnickety and with my quick temper, there was always the chance I would do some serious damage to the source of the aforementioned loud noise which would quite possibly land me in the jail house. And then there was the fact that I had only ever thought of sweet soufflés, I never even considered that there could be a savory soufflé.

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Well I am very pleased to say that all those Saturday morning cartoons mislead me a bit on the soufflé front, as well as many others I’m sure. I can probably need not worry about coyotes toting huge Acme anvils or sticks of TNT either.:)

Ha! Remember these guys?

Ha! Remember these guys?

These Irish Cheddar & Thyme Potato Soufflés were not difficult to make at all. And they taste ahhh-mazing! So light, so fluffy. And completely adorable in their little individual serving dishes. Kind of fancy, yet they also have a bit of a rustic vibe. The husband went mad for them and wondered where they had been all his life. So if you are looking for a unique potato dish for those St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, why not try these soufflés? Take it from me, no need to be scared….soufflés can be your new BFF!

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Irish Cheddar & Thyme Potato Soufflés

  • Servings: 2 - 5 inch shuffles & 4 Le Creuset mini Cocottes
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

recipe slightly adapted from: One Sweet Mess

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 lbs. potatoes, peeled and cubed.
  • 2 Tablespoons butter, plus more for brushing
  • 1 heaping cup grated Kerry Gold Reserve Cheddar cheese
  • 1/3 cup half and half
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped thyme, leaves only
  • 3 large eggs, separated and at room temperature
  • scant 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375° F. Generously brush the inside of 2 (5-inch) soufflé dishes, as well as 4 Le Creuset cocottes with butter.

Cut the potatoes into 1-inch chunks. Add the potatoes to a large pot and cover with cold water. Bring the potatoes to a boil over medium-high heat. Continue to cook until the potatoes are fork tender, about 10 minutes.

Drain the potatoes very well. Either place the potatoes in a food mill or run them though a potato ricer. The moral of the story is that you want these mashed potatoes to be very finely processed. You can even do this with a good old potato masher. But if you do, make sure you really mash them well!

Stir in the butter, grated cheese, half and half, and thyme. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Stir in the egg yolks.

Add the egg whites to a large bowl. Whisk until the whites become foamy. Add a pinch of cream of tartar to the bowl. Continue to whisk the egg whites until stiff peaks form.

Add a heaping scoop of egg whites to the potato mixture; gently fold to combine. Fold in the remaining egg whites until no streaks of white remain.

Fill each of the prepared soufflé dishes 3/4 of the way full with the potato mixture. Bake for 40-45 minutes, or until the soufflé is puffed and a rich golden brown color.

Enjoy!

Irish Cheddar & Thyme Potato Souflees brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

Links to Useful Kitchen Tools & Ingredients Irish Cheddar & Thyme Souflees:

Le Creuset Set of 4 Mini Cocottes

Potato Ricer

Herb Stripper

 

 


Whiskey & Orange Oat Cream Toddy

March 3, 2016

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Yes indeed! Contrary to what old Punxsutawney Phil would lead us to believe, it is still Winter. And I’ve noticed quite a few folks out there are sniffling and wheezing with winter colds. I know just what’s called for….a Whiskey & Orange Oat Cream Toddy! Chock full of vitamin C to build up your immune defenses and Irish Whiskey to kill any germs or at least make you feel a bit better if they’ve already managed to take hold. Unless the mercury around here suddenly takes a turn for the warmer, you’ll need one or two (or so…) of these to warm you body and soul after attending any St. Patrick’s Day parades. Both delicious and nutritious, so what are you waiting for? Sláinte!

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Whiskey & Orange Oat Cream Toddy

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

recipe from: The Complete Irish Pub Cookbook

Ingredients;

  • freshly squeezed juice of 6 large oranges
  • 1 – 1 1/2 Tablespoons honey, to taste
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 3 Tablespoons Irish Whiskey
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons rolled oats, toasted

Directions:

Squeeze the juice from the oranges. You should have 1 1/2 cups juice.

Add the juice to a small saucepan. Add the honey and heat until hot. Do not boil

In the meantime, whip the cream until soft peaks form. Stir in 1 Tablespoon of the Whiskey.

Add the remaining 2 Tablespoons of whiskey to the hot orange juice.

Pour the mixture into 2 warm whiskey glasses. Top with a layer of whipped cream and sprinkle with toasted oats.

Enjoy!

Whiskey & Orange Oat Cream Toddy brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

Links to Useful Kitchen Tools & Ingredients for Whiskey & Orange Oat Cream Toddy

Oxo Good Grips Double-Sided Citrus Juicer


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