Baileys & Coffee Pots de Crème with Baileys Whipped Cream Topping

March 7, 2015

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I am so excited about the recipe I have for you today…Baileys & Coffee Pots de Crème! Why so excited, besides that fact that I’ve got 7 days of my St. Patrick’s Day blog-a-palooza done and dusted (only 10 more days to go…)? Well, I am excited about that, but I’m also thrilled because these little treats are quite possibly a game changer for me. Not only were they delicious, and I’m talking a swoon-worthy kind of dessert, but they were so easy to make. I’m serious. No baking. Just a few whrrrr’s of the food processor and some chill time. And then before I knew it I had these simple yet elegant, boozy, rich, chocolatey decadent desserts, ready to be garnished and served.

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Pots de Crème (pronounced Po – think how southerners might pronounce “poor”- de Krehm) are a french custard which dates back to the 17th Century. Traditionally served in little pot shaped dishes (hence their name) or demitasse cups they are usually baked at low heat in a water bath. Their consistency is similar to a chocolate mousse but more dense yet not quite as firm as a flan. But this recipe today is for the new fangled Pots de Crème. As I said…no baking is involved. I’m telling you these little dreams are so easy to make you could do it first thing in the morning, while you’re still sleeping…perhaps before you’ve even had your first sip of coffee (or tea). Well, that might not be true, but they are pretty dang easy.

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However that doesn’t mean that there aren’t a couple of really important things you must do to ensure the success of this recipe. First of all, those eggs need to be room temperature. I promise you it will not work if you pull the eggs straight out of the fridge. Easiest thing to do is just set them out the night before. Oh come on! They are not going to go bad sitting out over night! But if this makes you nervous, you can let them soak in a bit of warm water to bring them up to room temperature. Again, I said warm water. Not boiling hot water. You don’t want to cook them at this point. Next important thing to remember is that it needs to be HOT coffee, not room temperature. I’m talking like McDonald’s lawsuit temperature coffee. That coffee has to melt all the chocolate as well as kill any bacteria that might be in those raw eggs, so don’t mess around. Put it in the microwave if you must and nuke it…nuke it real good! And finally once you’ve added the very HOT coffee, make sure you run the blender long enough that the chocolate is thoroughly melted and uniformly mixed. That is pretty much it. You just pour it into whatever containers you plan to serve it in, leaving plenty of room for the whipped cream and pop them into the fridge. In 3 -4 hours they will be set and ready to serve.

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I did this step first thing in the morning, though after I had my first mug or two of tea, the day of a dinner party and didn’t even think about them until I was ready to serve later that night. So there you have it. No fuss, no muss. And what a rousing success they were with the dinner guests. I mean, who doesn’t love coffee and Baileys and chocolate (oh my!).

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Folks thought that I had slaved away all day to come up with those divine silky Baileys Coffee treats I was serving up. And I won’t tell them otherwise, but aren’t you glad I let you in on the secret?

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Baileys & Coffee Pots de Crème with Baileys Whipped Cream Topping

  • Servings: 6 - 10 depending on the size of your jars or dishes
  • Difficulty: easy
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recipe from: Slim Pickin’s Kitchen

Ingredients:

  • 12 oz. (1 bag) high quality semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 4 eggs, room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons (possibly more depending on your mood…) Bailey’s Irish Cream, separated
  • 1 cup piping HOT, dark roast coffee
  • 1/2 pint heavy whipping cream
  • chocolate shavings or cocoa powder or even fresh fruit, for additional garnish

Directions:

Pour 1 tablespoon (or a bit more if you’re feeling a bit saucy) of Bailey’s Irish cream into the coffee and stir. Set aside.

Add chocolate chips and room temperature eggs (really – I can not stress it enough – not cold out of the fridge, but room temperature eggs) to a blender or food processor and pulse, about 5-6 times, until the chocolate is broken up into small bits. Small folks, try to make it as easy as possible for that coffee to work its melting magic.

Microwave that coffee to make sure it is really hot!

With the blender running, slowly stream in the Baileys coffee and continue blending until the chocolate melts and the mixture thickens.

Pour the Baileys and coffee mixture into 6-8 small mason jars, martini glasses, ramekins or tea cups and refrigerate for 3 -4 hours or until set.

Right before serving the pots de crème, add whipping cream to the bowl of a stand mixture and beat until soft peaks form. Beat in the remaining tablespoon (and perhaps a bit more…) of Baileys until well mixed.

Dollop the Baileys whipped cream on top of the pots de creme and serve with chocolate shavings or a dusting of cocoa powder.

Enjoy!

Baileys & Coffee Pots de Crème brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

 


Pan Haggerty

March 6, 2015

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Winter just won’t let go. We’ve had freezing rain, sleet, an ice storm and 8″of snow this week, not to mention that I have heard that the temperature is going to plunge down to 11° F (-12°C) tonight. I don’t know about you, but I think that seems a tad chilly for March. I guess there’s nothing to be done. Winter won’t leave until it is good and ready. So in the meantime I guess I’ll have to keep those ‘warm you up” recipes coming. I’ve got a great one for you today. Pan Haggerty. This dish, cooked and served in the same pan, is made up of potatoes, sauteed onions, bacon and cheese. Sounds great huh?

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Now there does seem to be some controversy whether it is an Irish dish or a British dish which hails from Northumberland. Seems everyone has a claim to it. I even read that sure it is associated with Northumberland, but that it was brought there by the Irish when they came to work in the mines. I don’t think it’ll ever be proven one way or another. But what I can tell you for certain is this rich, buttery, cheesy dish is definitely a winner! Served as a main dish or as a side, it is comfort food at its finest. And I think we could all use a bit of that right about now!

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Pan Haggerty

  • Servings: 4 - 6
  • Difficulty: easy
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recipe slightly adapted from: Seasons and Suppers

Ingredients:

  • 3 – 4 sliced bacon, diced
  • 1 medium yellow onion, sliced or diced
  • 3-4 sprigs of thyme, leaves only
  • 5-6 potatoes, thinly sliced into rounds (White potatoes or Yukon Gold – not Russets)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 – 1 1/2 cups grated Dubliner cheese (or substitute in your favourite)

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375° F.

In an oven-proof skillet, I prefer cast iron, over medium heat, heat a small amount  butter. Add the onions and a pinch of white sugar. Cook, stirring often, until onions are golden, about 10 minutes. Remove onions from pan and place in a small bowl. In the same pan, fry the bacon until browned and slightly crisp. Remove from the pan and combine in the bowl with the reserved onion and fresh thyme leaves.

In the same pan used to cook the bacon, arrange a layer of the sliced potatoes in the bottom of the pan. Sprinkle with 1/3 of the onion/bacon mixture. Add another layer of potatoes and another 1/3 of the bacon/onion mixture. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Add another layer of potatoes and the final 1/3 of the onion/bacon mixture. Top with a final layer of potatoes.

Cover the pan with a lid or a piece of tin foil and reduce the heat to a low. Cook for 15-20 minutes, or until the bottom layer of potatoes are golden.

Uncover the pan and place the skillet in the oven. Bake for 30 minutes or until potatoes are tender. Remove from oven and top with grated cheese.

Return pan to the broiler and heat until cheese is melted and and edges of potatoes are crisped, about 5 minutes more. To serve, cut wedges from the pan.

Enjoy!

Recipe brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

 

 


Cider-Brined Pork Chops with Sauteed Apples

March 5, 2015

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You might be wondering what makes Cider-Brined Pork Chops with Sautéed Apples a particularly Irish recipe. I suppose I would be hard-pressed to show an Irish provenance for it were someone to require it. What I can say is that all of the ingredients used in this dish are abundant in Ireland and have been part of the cuisine there for thousands of years. Indeed there is archaeological evidence which indicates that apples have been grown there for over 5000 years and cider making stretches back at least 2000 years if not more. We also know that wild boar was being consumed in Ireland as far back as 7000 BC. So although I didn’t actually find this recipe in an Irish cookbook, I know it is the type of dish, made with fresh locally sourced ingredients, that you would be likely to encounter when visiting the country. And I’ve got to tell you, it is absolutely delicious!

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You see these pork chops have been brined overnight in cider based brine. A brine is similar to a marinade, but is able to really permeate the meat, and infuse it with flavour. It also works to tenderize the meat. And these pork chops would nearly melt in your mouth!

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The classic combination of pork and apples also delivers that savory sweet sensation that I love. This dish would be very welcome in Fall when apples are in season but would also make a very nice St. Patrick’s Day offering. Now that I’ve made it once, I get the feeling that the husband will do his best to keep it in frequent rotation.

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Cider-Brined Pork Chops with Sautéed Apples

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
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recipe from: The Corner Kitchen

Ingredients:

For the brine and pork:

  • 2 cups apple cider
  • 2 Tablespoons salt
  • 2 Tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 pork chops, about 1 pound each
  • 1 Tablespoon olive oil

For the apples:

  • 2 Tablespoons butter
  • 1 apple, peeled, cored and sliced
  • 1/2 Tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 1/3 cup apple cider
  • 1/4 cup chicken stock
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme (can sub in 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme)

For the pan sauce:

  • 1/4 cup apple cider
  • 3/4 cup chicken stock
  • salt and freshly ground pepper

Instructions:

For the brine:

In a medium bowl whisk together the apple cider, salt and brown sugar. Continue mixing until the salt and sugar are completely dissolved. Pour the brine in a large resealable plastic bag, along with the pork chops. Seal and refrigerate for at least 4 hours, though preferably overnight.

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

For the Apples:

Melt the butter in a sauce pan over medium heat. Add the apple and brown sugar and stir to coat. Cook until the apples begin to soften, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. Pour in the wine and cook until mostly reduced. Stir in the apple cider, stock, thyme and a pinch of salt and pepper. Cook until the apples are very soft and most of the liquid has been absorbed. Set aside.

For the Pork Chops and pan sauce:

Remove the pork chops from the brine. Discard the liquid. Pat the meat dry and season both sides with salt and pepper. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large cast iron, or oven safe skillet, over medium high heat. When the oil is very hot (you’ll notice ripples in the oil), but not yet smoking. Add the pork chops to the pan. Cook until there is a good sear and the meat is browned, 3 -5 minutes. Use tongs to flip the meat and cook for another 3 -5 minutes to sear the other side.

Transfer the pan to the oven and cook for 10 – 15 minutes, depending on the thickness of the pork chops. The most accurate measure  of doneness is to test the temperature of the meat, which should be a 145°F. When the meat is completely cooked remove the pan from the oven and transfer the pork chops to a plate.

Add 1/4 cup apple cider and 3/4 cup of chicken stock to the same pan you used to cook the pork, and cook over high heat, scraping the bottom of the pan. Bring the liquid to a boil and cook until it’s reduced by at least half. Taste and season with additional salt and pepper, if necessary.

To serve, divide the pork chops between plates, top with apples and spoon the pan sauce over the meat.

Enjoy!

Cider-Brined Pork Chops with Sauteed Apples brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)


Banana Yellowman Bundt Cake

March 4, 2015

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Banana Yellowman Cake…Wow! The recipes have great eye-catching names this year. Chicken Skink yesterday and now Banana Yellowman. So what is a Banana Yellowman Cake? Well, it is a delicious moist banana cake that is shot through with little sticky nuggets of Yellowman and glazed with a caramel frosting. But what is Yellowman? Oh, right, unless you’re from Ireland, the term is probably not one you are familiar with. Yellowman is what Honeycomb is called in Ireland. It is also known as Cinder Toffee in Britain and Hokey Pokey in New Zealand and Cornwall. (I was tempted to call this cake a Hokey Pokey Cake because after I took one bite I was fairly certain that this cake could be “what it’s all about”, but since I’m including it in the St. Patrick’s Day countdown, I decided to go with “yellowman”). So, Yellowman is that yellow or golden sugary toffee with a crunchy sponge-like texture. You’ve maybe seen it in the middle of a Crunchie candy bar.

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I’m not sure if you can just go out and buy it in a shop, but the good news is that it is very easy and fun to make. And if you have kids, they can help out and get a quick chemistry lesson as well. You see the reaction between the vinegar and the baking soda produces carbon dioxide gas, which gives the Yellowman its bubbly, crunchy consistency.

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The reaction is quite dramatic  once that baking soda is added. Seriously it foams up to about 4x its original size, so make sure you are using a deep pan. And do exercise caution because you have to heat it to 300°F (150°C) before you add that baking soda, so there is potential there for some serious burns. Once you have a batch of Yellowman made up, you can use some of it in this cake, of course, but you can also dip it in chocolate for a great treat all on its own, or crumble it over ice cream.

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I first came across this recipe on a great blog from the West of Ireland, Warm & Snug & Fat. The husband has never met a banana dessert he didn’t like, so I knew this cake would be a winner. And I am often looking for a way to use up bananas that have crossed over that thin line of ripe enough to way too ripe. This cake takes care of four of those types of casualties. After the Yellowman has been made, the cake comes together quickly and easily. And boy does it deliver on taste. Moist, tender, very notable banana flavour and when you get a bite with one of those bonus golden nuggets of goodness, it is pure bliss.

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This cake would be just fine without the frosting, but the frosting really puts it over the top and provides something to which even more of that crumbled Yellowman can cling on to. And as far as Yellowman is concerned, the more the merrier!

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Banana Yellowman Bundt Cake

  • Servings: 1 bundt cake
  • Difficulty: easy
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recipe from: Warm & Snug & Fat

Ingredients:

For the cake:

  • 225 grams (8oz) plain flour
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 heaped tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 110 grams (4oz) caster sugar (can substitute granulated sugar)
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 75 grams (3oz) butter, melted
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract
  • 65 grams (2½ oz) yellowman/ honeycomb, smashed (recipe for yellowman/honeycomb below)
  • 4 medium-sized ripe bananas, mashed

For the caramel frosting:

  • 115 grams butter
  • 115 grams light muscovado sugar
  • 140 ml heavy cream

Directions:

 Sift the flour, salt, baking powder and cinnamon into a bowl and stir in the sugar.

Mix in the egg, melted butter and vanilla but do not beat.

Fold in the honeycomb and mashed bananas, using a fork. Again, do not beat.

Spoon into a buttered and floured bundt tin or lined (3½ inch x 8 inch) 900 gram/2lb loaf tin and bake in an oven preheated to 350° F ( 180° C, gas mark 4) for 50-60 minutes, until the cake is golden brown and springs back when prodded gently with your finger.

Leave in the tin for 10 minutes, then turn onto a wire rack to cool.

Once cake is completely cool, drizzle caramel frosting over the top. You can also add some extra crumbled honeycomb to garnish.

Enjoy!

Yellowman, Honeycomb, Cinder toffee, Hokey Pokey

recipe from: Nigella.com

Ingredients:

  • 100 grams caster sugar (can substitute granulated, but you should probably give it a couple of pulses in the food processor to make the sugar “superfine”)
  • tablespoons Lyle’s golden syrup
  • 1 ½ teaspoons bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
  • 25 ml water

Directions:

Put the sugar and syrup into a saucepan and stir together to mix. If you notice that sugar is clinging to the sides of the pan, you can paint the sides with a pastry brush dipped in water. Once you turn on the heat, it is very important that you do not touch it! That’s right, no stirring.

Place the pan on the heat and let the mixture first melt. Continue watching the pan closely. You will notice that it will liquefy and then turn a dark amber color. It should reach a temperature of 150°C/300°F. Or you can drop a bit of it in a small bowl of water and if it forms a hard ball when it hits the water, it is done. I think the thermometer version is easier. It will take about 3 minutes or so, depending on how high you have the heat.

Take the pan off the heat, whisk in the bicarbonate of soda. Take care because the mixture will bubble up crazily, like a volcano comes to mind. Turn this immediately onto a piece of baking parchment or greased foil. Don’t try to smooth it out. Just pour it and leave it alone.

Once it has cooled, smash it will a rolling pin or hammer so that it splinters into many pieces.

Store in a air-tight bowl.

Banana Yellow Bundt Cake brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

 


Chicken Skink

March 3, 2015

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Yup, you read that right…Chicken Skink. Skink is an old Irish term meaning “broth”. So Chicken Skink is an Irish Chicken Soup. You might have actually heard the term before in the famous Scottish dish, Cullen Skink. Cullen is a small town in Moray on the Northeast coast of Scotland. Apparently the way they make skink there is with smoked haddock. The husband was very happy I chose to go with an Irish skink, since he has a seafood allergy.

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This skink has chicken in it, along with leeks, carrots, celery and peas. It is enriched with cream and egg yolk which makes it a bit heartier than  your average chicken soup, which is a good thing because winter seems to be firmly entrenched around here. This skink is just what you need to warm you up but not weigh you down when you’re dashing around to all the St. Patrick’s Day parades and festivities. Make a big pot up of it today!

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Chicken Skink

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
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recipe from: The Complete Irish Pub Cookbook

Ingredients:

  • 2 celery stalks, halved lengthwise and diced
  • 4 small carrots, thinly sliced
  • 2 small leeks, halved lengthwise and sliced
  • 3 1/2 Cups chicken stock
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 sprigs of thyme, leaves only
  • 1 cup diced cooked chicken
  • 1/2 cup peas
  • 4 small scallions, some green tops included, sliced
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1/3 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 4 Boston or butter lettuce leaves, shredded
  • salt and pepper

Directions:

Put the celery, carrots and leeks in a saucepan with the stock, bay leaf, and salt and pepper to taste. Cover and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium, then simmer for 15 minutes or until tender.

Add the chicken, peas and scallions. Simmer for about 8 minutes, or until the peas are just tender.

Remove the pan from the heat. Lightly beat the egg yolk and cream together and stir the mixture into the soup. Reheat gently, stirring.

Ladle into warm bowls, add the lettuce and serve immediately.

Enjoy!

Chicken Skink brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)


Irish Soda Bread Muffins

March 2, 2015

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Yes indeed-y…Day Two of the St. Patrick’s Day count down and today I’m featuring Irish Soda Bread Muffins. Now before you folks in Ireland sneak a peek at the ingredients and start shaking your head, raising your eyebrow and getting a bit huffy…let me explain. I didn’t actually say “traditional Irish Soda Bread” Muffins. I openly admit, these muffins are a departure from “traditional” Irish Soda Bread. Traditional Irish Soda bread is a quick bread, meaning it uses baking soda as a leavener rather than yeast. The only other ingredients involved are flour, either whole meal, used for the every-day, or white, which was used for special occasions, buttermilk and salt. That’s it! Back in the day, currants were a luxury item which again might have been used along with a bit of sugar or an egg if the bread was being made for a special occasion, but not on a daily basis.

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Soda bread was traditionally cooked in a lidded cast iron pan which was placed directly on the coals of a fire. Irish immigrants brought the recipe for this bread with them when they came to America. This is the point where things begin to change, or I suppose you could say evolved if you had a friendly eye to the changes. Clever folks are quick to adapt to new situations and that is just what these immigrants did. Finding themselves in a new land where the availability and cost of ingredients were very different from what they had found at home, they had to improvise. And these modifications were often reflected in the dishes that were cooked. That is why an Irish-American might have a very different idea of what “traditional Irish” food is. Soda Bread is a great example of that phenomena, as is Corned Beef (shock…horror…but more on that later). I love traditional Irish Soda Bread and make it myself all the time. I also like the thoroughly Americanized versions, for the most part…. (Cue the ominous sounding music here)

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Once in America the flour used in soda bread became almost exclusively white, butter was not only slathered over the slices of bread but was also added into the dough, as was sugar, eggs, raisins and often caraway seeds. I have to stop right here and say that while I’m ok with all of the other modifications to this bread, I HATE caraway seeds in my soda bread. I’m actually glad you can’t see the face I’m making right now, but it is a cross between disgust and outrage. Wait…perhaps I do have a picture that I can share that will convey my feelings adequately…

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Me upon finding out there are caraway seeds in my soda bread. Should I be troubled that this is one of the husband’s favorite pics of me?!!

I’m serious, I don’t know how folks could ruin perfectly good bread with those dastardly little seeds. Just say NO! Ahem…So back to these lovely Americanized Irish Soda Bread Muffins we have here. Gone is the big round soda bread loaf, replaced with perfect serving sized muffins. Needless to say, there are no caraway seeds, but there are Irish Whiskey plumped currants, as well as a blend of All-purpose flour and King Arthur Irish Wholemeal flour, which gives them a pleasant toothsome texture over those made with white flour alone. Though if you don’t have Irish Wholemeal flour, you could use regular whole meal flour, or just use 2 1/4 cups of all-purpose in a pinch. The muffins are just perfect with a nice cup of tea, moist, tender, slightly sweet, but not too sweet. Just enough to satisfy any tea time cravings. They are delicious all on their own, with a bit of jam spread over the top, or my favourite…covered with lashings of butter! Certainly a crowd pleaser for your St. Patrick’s Day celebrations.

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Irish Soda Bread Muffins

  • Servings: 12 Muffins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

recipe slightly adapted from: King Arthur Flour

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups (6 1/4 ounces, 177 grams)  All purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup (3 ounces, 85 grams) King Arthur Irish Wholemeal flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup (2 5/8 ounces, 74 grams) granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups (6 ounces, 170 grams) currants (first choice) or raisins
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup (8 ounces, 227 grams) buttermilk yogurt, or sour cream
  • 6 tablespoons (3 ounces, 85 grams) butter, melted; or 1/3 cup vegetable oil
  • sparkling white sugar, for topping

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Lightly grease a standard muffin pan; or line with papers, and grease the papers.

Place currants/raisins in bowl and cover with boiling water, adding 1 tablespoon irish whiskey to the mix if you’re feeling a bit devilish. Let raisins steep for about 10 minutes to plump. Thoroughly drain before incorporating into the batter.

In a medium-sized mixing bowl, whisk together the flours, baking powder, baking soda, salt and sugar.

In a separate bowl, whisk together the egg, buttermilk (or equivalent) and melted butter (or equivalent).

Quickly and gently combine the dry and wet ingredients; honestly, this won’t take more than a few stirs with a bowl scraper or large spoon. As soon as everything is evenly moistened, quickly and gently fold in the plumped currants or raisins and then quit; further stirring will cause the muffins to be tough.

Spoon the batter into the prepared pan, filling the cups about 3/4 full; the stiff batter will look mounded in the cups. Top with sparkling white sugar, if desired.

Bake the muffins for 20 minutes, until a cake tester inserted into the center of a muffin comes out clean. Remove them from the oven. Tip the muffins in the pan, so their bottoms don’t get soggy. Wait 5 minutes, then transfer the muffins to a rack to cool. Serve them plain, or with butter and/or jam.

Enjoy!

Irish Soda Bread Muffins brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)


Guinness Hot Chocolate topped with Guinness Marshmallows

March 1, 2015

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Hello, hello, hello! Today is March 1st, which means that starting today I will be posting one Irish-y recipe every day all the way up to the big day…March 17th….St. Patrick’s Day! I’ve been inexplicably doing this for a few years now, so I’ve got quite a lot of great St. Patrick’s Day food ideas for you from past years as well. Just click Runcible Eat/Recipes up at the top navigation bar and scroll down to the St. Patrick’s Day category. There are over 50 recipes to choose from there. Not to mention all those that I will be adding this year. Which brings me back to today. I wanted to start my St. Patrick’s Day blog-a-thon off right and I thought I’d go for something boozy and decadent! That is just what I’ve got going on here with this Guinness Hot Chocolate topped with Guinness Marshmallows.

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And let me be clear….this is homemade Guinness Hot Chocolate…no powders here…with homemade Guinness Marshmallows bobbing around on top! Whaaaaat?!! Before I did it, I didn’t know marshmallows could be made at home…well that’s a bit of a fib…I should say I didn’t think I would ever do it.

Homemade Marshmallows waiting to be dusted

Homemade Marshmallows waiting to be dusted

Woooweee! They can and I sure did. And once you taste them, you’ll be spoiled for those little plasticy nuggets that come in bags at your local grocery.

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You’re kind of getting two recipes today as well. Of course, they can be served together. Gooey Homemade Marshmallows melting on top of a big mug of piping hot silky smooth liquid chocolate and Guinness blend is a no-brainer for sure, especially in light of the lovely weather we have been graced with this winter. But you can also just serve these marshmallows as a treat all on their own. Once you’ve accessorized them to meet whatever your tastes might be, they simply look divine and taste pretty heavenly as well!

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I’ve provided you with a couple of toppings options, but really you can add whatever you like. Get creative! But definitely try your hand at a batch of these Guinness Marshmallows today!

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But let’s not forget that rich, thick and creamy Guinness Hot Chocolate with all of the Guinness Marshmallow excitement. It will be exactly what the doctor called for to warm you once you’re back inside after the parades. Cold weather simply calls for the comfort of Hot Chocolate and the addition of the Guinness, which adds a bit of a nutty depth of flavour, really ups its game.

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Yup, this Hot Chocolate with an Irish twist is pretty special all on its own, but when you pop a couple of the marshmallows on top, you’ll think you’ve died and gone to heaven! So there you have it…day one of this years St. Patrick’s Day blog-a-polooza done and dusted. Only 16 more to go! Hope you’ll stick around for all the fun!

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Guinness Hot Chocolate topped with Guinness Marshmallows

  • Servings: 3 cups or 24 ounces for the hot chocolate. Number of servings will vary according to the mug size you plan to use and anywhere from 9 - 120 Marshmallows -depending how you slice them
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

recipes from: Guinness Marshmallows: Yes, More Please! Guinness Hot Chocolate: The Beeroness

Ingredients:

For the Marshmallows:

  • 3 envelopes unflavored gelatin /approx. 21 grams (I used powder, you’re welcome to use gelatin sheets )
  • 1 cup cold, flat Guinness Stout
  • 2 cups granulated white sugar
  • 1/2 cup corn syrup
  • 2 pinches of sea salt
  • 2 large egg whites beaten until stiff peaks.
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

To dust:

  • ½ cup confectioners sugar
  • ½ cup cornstarch

For Toppings:

  • 1 cup dark chocolate for melting.
  • caramel sauce
  • 3-4 tablespoons roasted salted pistachios crushed.
  • Salty, pretzels
  • Maldon flaky salt

Directions:

For the Marshmallows:

Whisk the Guinness to flatten. Or just crack one open and leave it sitting the night before you plan to make the marshmallows. Remove some of the foam if necessary.

Lightly oil your 8×8 pan and generously dust with the confectioners sugar and cornstarch mixture. Reserve the rest for use when cutting the marshmallows.

Using the mixing bowl of your stand mixer, place ½ cup of Guinness and sprinkle the 3 envelopes of gelatin powder. Leave to bloom.

In a separate bowl, whisk your egg whites until stiff peaks set aside.

In a medium saucepan (and when I say medium, I mean you want to have sides at least 4″ high – if you’re nervous like me, go for an even deeper pan!) over medium high heat mix the sugar, corn syrup, and the other ½ cup of flat beer until the sugar is dissolved. At this point attach the candy thermometer to your saucepan and bring this sugary mixture to a slow boil until it reaches 240°F/ 116°C . This sticky, lava-like syrup will bubble up and foam like mad before it reaches 240°F. Stay calm! And stay back…it also pops and spits and burns like the dickens if any of that molten stuff lands on you! Remove from heat.

Fitted with the whisk, start your stand mixer on the slowest speed. Being very careful, start adding the hot syrup in a low stream to incorporate with the bloomed gelatine.

Once you pour in all the syrup, mix for 2 minutes and then proceed to add the egg whites along with the vanilla extract.

Mix  on high for about 10-12 minutes, until the mixture has double or tripled in size, it turns an off-white color, it has a nice shine to it and it holds stiff peaks.

At this point with the help of a spatula (lightly spray the spatula with some nonstick spray), Pour all this fluffy and highly sticky gooey goodness into your greased and powdery pan.

 Flatten the top and allow the marshmallow to dry for at least 4-6 hours. Overnight is best. The marshmallow should fill springy and soft  to the  touch.

Once dry, over a piece of parchment paper generously dusted with powder sugar and cornstarch mixture, un-mold the marshmallow sheet with a little spatula pulling from one corner and place the big square on top of the paper. With the help of a dusted knife, pastry cutter, pizza cutter or scissors, cut your marshmallows into squares.

Once they are cut, place the remainder of the confectioners sugar and cornstarch mixture in a bowl and toss the squares, so every side is covered with powder to avoid sticking. Shake the excess powder, and place the marshmallows on a clean cookie rack.

At this point, you will need to decide how many of these marshmallow are going to be used in hot chocolate and how many will simply be devoured all on their lonesome. The only reason I say this is that I prefer to have non-pretzelfied/pistachio’ed marshmallows on my hot chocolate, but to each his own. Proceed with toppings as you see fit!

Melt the dark chocolate, and warm any other sauces you plan to use. Drizzle the marshmallows, sprinkle with toppings of your choice.

Devour!

Guinness Hot Chocolate

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup Heavy Cream
  • ½ cup Milk
  • ½ cup Dark Chocolate Chips
  • 1 cup Guinness
  • 2 Tablespoons Sugar (if desired – remember those marshmallows will add quite a bit of sweetness as well)

Directions:

In a pan over medium high heat, add the cream, milk and chocolate chips. Stir until melted, about 5 minutes.

Remove from heat, stir in the Guinness. Depending on your personal preference, add in the 2 tbs of sugar for a higher level of sweetness.

Return to heat and stir until desired temperature is reached (Usually between 140 and 160 degrees F).

Serve hot chocolate topped with Guinness Marshmallows.

Enjoy!

Guinness Hot Chocolate Topped with Guinness Marshmallows brought to you by: Runcible Eats (www.leaandjay.com)

 


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