Irish Coffee Scones with Whiskey Butter

March 9, 2013

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Here it is, Day 9 of my St. Patrick’s Day countdown and I think it’s time for another yummy breakfast treat. We haven’t had one since back on Day 1 when I posted about those irresistible Chocolate & Raspberry Buttermilk Doughnuts. Not that I’m opposed to the occasional slice of cold pizza, or even better, cold, left over french fries for breakfast. But I’m talking about a recipe for “official”  or ” classic” breakfast food. How about some lovely Irish Coffee Scones? Yeah, scones are perfect for breakfast. And these are for St. Patrick’s Day, so let’s do this thing up right. It’s a special occasion. Not an everyday thing. These scones have coffee, which is an essential for breakfast. And they have Baileys, I think we have established how I feel about the Baileys Irish Cream. It has been in high rotation in my recent culinary creations. So all that is missing for these to be a well-rounded St. Patrick’s Day breakfast would be a nice shot of Jameson. Oh…I’ve got it! We’ll stick it in the butter! Whiskey Butter….that’s what I’m talking about! How fantastic, Irish Coffee Scones with Whiskey Butter!

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These Irish Coffee Scones are very moist, quite tender and definitely have a pronounced coffee-y/Baileys flavour. They are very light, almost more cake-like than biscuit/scone like, perhaps due to the addition of the cake flour. They are pretty easy to make, though I will say the dough is quite sticky, so just make sure your hands and prep surface are well floured. As long as you’ve got that covered, you’ll be fine. As with all scones, make sure your butter is very cold when you cut it into the flour and once you’ve added liquid to your dry ingredients, handle the dough as little and as gingerly as possible, otherwise your scones will be tough. Make sure that you don’t forget to sprinkle sugar-in-the-raw over the top of your scones, as it gives them a really lovely crunchy texture. And oh….when serving these delectable little morsels, the Whiskey Butter is not optional. It is a requirement! Start St. Patrick’s Day off right and bake up a batch!

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Irish Coffee Scones with Whiskey Butter

recipe from: Buttercream Blondie

yield: 8 scones

Ingredients:

  • 1 and 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/4 cups cake flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 1/2 sticks unsalted butter, cold & cubed
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup strong coffee
  • 1/4 cup Baileys Irish Cream

Directions:

Brew coffee & set aside to cool.

Combine dry ingredients together in a bowl.

Cut in cold, cubed butter.

Whisk eggs with cool coffee and Baileys.

Add to dry ingredients and mix till it comes together. This is a wet dough at first & kind of sticky.   It will come together.

Turn dough out onto a well floured surface.

Pat dough out into a circle.  You can use a rolling pin if you want, I use my hands to shape it. ( I divided the dough in half and patted each dough half into a circle, for a more petite scone. This dough is quite sticky, so make sure your surface, as well as your hands are well floured.)

Slice dough into 8 wedges (or if you have divided the dough into two halves, cut it into 4 wedges) & refrigerate until ready to bake.  Make sure the dough is cold when it goes into the oven.

Brush with heavy cream & sprinkle with sugar in the raw.

Bake at 400° F  for 15-20 minutes, rotating once halfway through.

Whiskey Butter

  • 1 stick unsalted butter
  • 1 Tablespoon Irish whiskey  (I used Jameson)
  • pinch of salt

Whip butter with whiskey and salt.

Enjoy!


Scáiltín (Milk Punch)

March 7, 2013

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I thought you might enjoy this recipe for a St. Patrick’s Day beverage. Scáiltín, or Milk Punch, is a hot drink made with milk, Irish whiskey and spices. It has been enjoyed in Ireland since the Middle Ages. I can just see myself, curled up next to the fire with a good book and a big mug of the stuff. Perhaps I can see this so clearly because that is exactly what happened on last night’s snowy eve! Yup, the weather folks were right. It sure did snow yesterday and everything was closed down. It was that really heavy, wet snow that had a lot of rain mixed in. It is mostly gone now around here, though I understand that folks out closer to the mountains got a whole lot more of the stuff. It was an absolutely perfect day to make up a batch of this punch.

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Now let me explain, it wasn’t like I was swanning about the house all day yesterday sipping big mugs of Scáiltín and occasionally pausing to snap a photo or two of the blessed concoction. Well, I might have taken a nip of two from the mugs….but it was strictly for research purposes. I certainly wouldn’t want to blog about something that I didn’t think tasted delicious. And in my defense, it was a snow day. Yes, my husband and I both work from home, but that doesn’t mean we can’t join in with the spirit of a snow day. And I definitely was not “swanning about” in the least. But this is about Scáiltín, not me. So let me tell you this silky smooth, spicy cuppa really does pack a punch and will  warm you head to toes. I can see why it was thought to be medicinal. Great for a nightcap or with some cookies in the afternoon or as a remedy for a damp, bone-chilling, slush shoveling day.

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Interestingly enough, whilst I was researching Scáiltín, I came across a recipe for New Orleans Milk Punch which is thought to have its origins from Irish Scáiltin, but has evolved appropriately to be imbibed in steamy Louisiana. This beverage is served cold, either over ice or in a “slushy” state. Well, I was very excited to see this. I mean it is a wee bit cold in the winter months in Virginia, we did have a slush storm yesterday, but it is muggy, hot and humid for the majority of the time. So, iced drinks are really popular. And everyone knows, Americans LOVE ice, and lots of it. Literally can’t get enough of the stuff. If we’re getting a cocktail, fill that glass up with ice. Our beer, we want it icy cold and in a chilled mug. We even ice down our tea (gasp, horror). I can assure you, if I lived in New Orleans, one of the muggiest places going, I would drink my Milk Punch in milkshake form!

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Now a New Orleans Milk Punch is a bit different from Scáiltín, and not only in temperature. Sure there is milk, but the alcohol added can differ. I found recipes which called for Bourbon, other whiskies or Brandy, though it seems that Brandy is preferred in the Big Easy. Powdered sugar is the sweetener rather than honey and vanilla extract was added to the mix. Although I didn’t see a recipe which called for cinnamon or ginger, nutmeg did make the cut. How exciting! Apparently, New Orleans Milk Punch is often enjoyed at brunch as a sort of “hair of the dog”. I can just see myself sipping it pool side, under a large shady umbrella I assure you. I just couldn’t resist giving you the recipes for both versions and that way you’ll be set with an appropriate beverage no matter how close to the equator you are when you’re celebrating St. Patrick’s Day. Sláinte! (Irish for “to your health”).

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Scáiltín

Recipe from: The Complete Irish Pub Cookbook

Yield: 2 mugs

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 1/2 cup Irish Whiskey (I used Jameson)
  • 1-2 tablespoons honey (or to taste)
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon (I really like cinnamon and used 1/4 tsp.)
  • 2 pats of irish butter (optional)
  • freshly grated nutmeg, to garnish

Directions:

Pour the milk and whiskey into a small saucepan and stir in the honey, ginger and cinnamon.

Heat over low heat, without letting the mixture boil, a whisking briskly to create a froth.

Pour into two warm mugs, top with a pat of butter and sprinkle with grated nutmeg.

Enjoy!

New Orleans Milk Punch

recipe from: Epicurious

yield: 4 cups

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup brandy, (or Bourbon, or other Whiskey )
  • 3 cups milk
  • 3 tablespoons powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 4 gratings fresh nutmeg
  • Handful of ice cubes
  • Crushed ice in 4 glasses

Directions:

Put the brandy (bourbon or other whiskey), milk, sugar, vanilla, nutmeg, and ice cubes into a blender and blend for 20 seconds.

Strain into glasses of crushed ice, garnish with extra nutmeg gratings and serve.

Enjoy!


Grilled Irish Whiskey Steak & Leeks in Cream Mustard

March 6, 2013

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Grilled Irish Whiskey Steak & Leeks with Cream Mustard go so well together I couldn’t just give you one recipe without divulging the other. So here they both are. Add a small side salad and you’ll be set for a great St. Patricks Day dinner.

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Now let me give you a few tips on the steak preparation and grilling method. In the marinade, I used Jameson Irish Whiskey, as I so often do, I seem to have a clear bias. You can marinade your steaks for as little as 1 hour, but I usually try to let them marinade in the refrigerator overnight. You can use any cut of steak you prefer such as flat iron, ribeye, new york strip etc. but make sure you check grilling times depending on how thick your steaks are and how well you like them cooked. The directions for grilling the steaks assume you are using a gas grill. I think steaks grilled over charcoal are better, but I just can’t be bothered messing with a charcoal grill. A gas grill is so much more convenient, I will actually use it more frequently. And the ability to more easily control the temperature of the flame gives us much more consistent results.

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What a second, who am I kidding here?! I never do the actual grilling. I think that is “man’s work” , what with all that lighting the grill manually when the supposed “automatic lighter” inevitably doesn’t work (hey…I once lost a good portion of my lovely fringe to a temperamental gas oven, so I admit I have some baggage here), and the braving of the hoards of mosquitos (alright, not so much in winter, but most of grilling season in Virginia they are hanging around just waiting for you to set foot outside your door so that they can pounce and drain you dry!). Thank goodness my husband indulges me in this and does a masterful job manning the grill!

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The Leeks in Cream Mustard are really yummy as well. I’m sure ya’ll have figured out how we are about leeks around here by now. I cooked these up in little individual gratins, but you could make this in a larger casserole dish if you wished.

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And I must admit, the bit where I cut the leeks into perfectly sized bits to go into my ramekin and tied it up with kitchen twine…

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well, I was being a bit artsy here. I thought it might look nice in the photos of the finished dish. There is no reason to do this if you don’t want to. It would be far easier to just pre-cut the leeks, par-boil them, place them into ramekins and then spoon the sauce over them. I’ll let you decide how fiddle-y you wish to be on this one.

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There is actually a story about St. Patrick and leeks. It seems there was a dying woman that St. Patrick was tending to. She told the Saint that she had seen a vision of an herb and that she thought that unless she could find it and eat it, she would surely die. She described this healing herb to Saint Patrick as something that looked like rushes. The Saint then went outside and blessed the rushes so that they became leeks. He fed them to the woman who became healthy once again! I told you leeks were good for you!

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Grilled Irish Whiskey Steak

recipe adapted from: allrecipes

serves: 4

Ingredients:

  • 2/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons Irish Whiskey
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon minced green onion
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/8 teaspoon crushed dried rosemary
  • 4 (8 oz.) steaks

Directions:

Combine the olive oil, whiskey, soy sauce, green onion, garlic, pepper, parsley, thyme and rosemary in a large Ziplock bag. Seal and shake bag to combine ingredients. Add the steaks to the marinade. Seal the bag. Refrigerate for 1 hour minimum, but overnight is preferable. One hour before grilling, remove steaks from marinade and allow them to come to room temperature.

Preheat the grill to as hot as you can get it. Clean and then lightly oil the cooking grate.

Place steaks on to grill only when the grill has reached its hottest temperature. Sear the steaks, approximately 2 minutes on each side and then turn the grill down to medium heat to finish cooking. Check internal temperature of the steaks after they have cooked for 8 – 10 minutes per side for a 3/4″ – 1″ piece of meat. The internal temperature for a steak cooked to medium is 140° F.

Remove steaks from grill and cover with two layers of aluminum foil. Allow the meat to rest in a warm area for 10 minutes prior to serving.

Enjoy!

Leeks in Cream Mustard

recipe from: Le Creuset’s Mini Cocotte cookbook

Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 4 leeks – about 1.5″ (3 cm) diameter
  • 3/4 cup (200 ml) chicken stock
  • 3/4 cup (200 ml) heavy cream
  • 1 Tablespoon wholegrain mustard
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 cup parmesan cheese
  • salt & pepper

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350° F (190°C)

Wash the leeks. Use only the white part. Cut the white stalks in half and carefully rinse with cold running water. Cut each stalk into 5 pieces. Tie the individual peieces together with kitchen twine, so that they don’t fall apart during the par-boil. Or if you don’t want to be too fussy, just slice the leeks into smaller pieces and don’t worry with the twine.

Bring the chicken stock to a boil then let it cool. Whisk in the cream, mustard, nutmeg and parmesan. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Par-boil the leeks for 3 minutes in salted water. Stop the cooking by rinsing them under cold water.

Divide the leeks between 4 mini cocottes or ramekins. Pour several spoonfuls of the mustard and cream mixture over the top of each one. (until leeks are mostly covered) Bake for 20 minutes or until top is just starting to brown a bit. Serve hot and bubbly!

Enjoy!

 


Irish Whiskey Cake with a Butter-Whiskey Glaze

March 9, 2012

Whack for my daddy-o

Whack for my daddy-o

There’s whiskey in the jar!

That’s right! I’m baking whiskey cakes in little jars again. The first time I gave this a whirl I made Jack Daniels Cakes. For St. Patrick’s Day I made some lovely little Irish Whiskey (Jameson….is there any other? Hmmm….this might stir a bit of discussion….) cakes in canning jars. But I didn’t stop there…Oh no! Once these delicious morsels finished baking, I poked holes in the top of the cakes and drizzled a gorgeous Irish Whiskey-Butter Sauce all over them. Then, on a roll and not to be stopped, I topped them with some whipped cream. Good Lord! These cakes are heavenly! I’m still dreaming about that Whiskey-Butter Sauce. And they are portable, since they are in little jars, great for a party! I was initially worried about baking in canning jars, but it is very easy.

No greasing or flouring necessary. Just remember not to fill the jar more than half way full with the cake batter or you will have an over-flow incident in your oven, and no one likes that. You can also bake this as one big cake in a bundt pan if you’d rather not fool with the individual jars. But the little jars of whiskey cake seemed so appropriate for St. Patrick’s….How does that song go again?

Whack for my daddy-o

Whack for my daddy-o

There’s whiskey in the jar! (and there really is!)

 

Irish Whiskey Cake

recipe from: Sprinkle Bakes

yield: 10 servings

Ingredients:

This cake can be made in 10 – 8 oz. or 12 oz. glass canning jars  -or- a 10″ bundt pan, greased and lightly floured.

For the Cake(s): 

  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1 1/2 cups strongly brewed coffee
  • 1/4 cup plus 3 tbsp. Irish whiskey
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

For the Butter-Whiskey Sauce:

  • 1/4 cup Irish whiskey
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1/4 cup water
  • Prepared whipped cream (for jar cakes)

Directions:

For the Cakes:

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

Whisk together flour, baking soda and salt in a large bowl; set aside.

In a medium saucepan, add coffee, whiskey, butter, cinnamon, and cocoa powder.  Place over moderate heat and whisk until butter has melted.  Remove from heat and add the sugar.  Whisk until incorporated.  Pour mixture into a large bowl and let cool slightly.

Whisk together eggs and vanilla extract and gradually pour into chocolate mixture.  Add flour mixture and whisk until just combined.  Mixture will be very thin.

Place canning jars on a cookie sheet or roasting pan and pour batter in each by the level 1/2 cups full; OR pour batter into a greased and floured bundt pan.

Bake for 45-55 minutes (for both jars and bundt pan).

For the Sauce:

When the cake(s) are almost ready to come out of the oven, begin to make the sauce.

Combine all ingredients (except whipped cream)  in a small saucepan, and cook very gently over medium heat until sugar has dissolved.  Remove from heat.

When cake(s) are done, let them cool for 10 minutes.  With a skewer, poke holes in the jarred cakes and pour a little sauce into each cake -dividing it evenly until it has all been used.  Top with prepared whipped cream.

If making a bundt cake, turn the cake out and place it upside down (as it baked in the oven). Poke holes all over the surface and VERY SLOWLY drizzle sauce over the cake until it has completely absorbed all of the sauce.  Wrap in foil and let cool completely.  Store in an air-tight container.

Enjoy!


Irish Car Bomb Cupcakes

March 17, 2011

Lá Féile Pádraig Shona Daiobh! (Happy St. Patrick’s Day! )Today is the last St. Patrick’s Day recipe that I will be posting this year. But this one is a goodie! As if my blog hasn’t been boozy enough recently, I thought you might like to make some cupcakes which feature three fantastic Irish adult style beverages, namely Guinness Stout, Jameson Irish Whiskey and Bailey’s Irish Cream. The ingredients here are reminiscent of the beer cocktail which I’m sure many St. Patrick’s Day revelers will be drinking today….The Car Bomb. What in the world is a Car Bomb that you drink? Well, you take a shot glass. Fill it most of the way with Baileys Irish Cream. Float some Jameson Whiskey on top of it and then drop the shot glass into a pint of Guinness Stout. There is a somewhat explosive foaming reaction from the Guinness and the drinkers goal is to chug the whole thing down before it curdles. Wow huh? The drink was not invented in Ireland, but seems to have come from Norwich, Connecticut. This insane cocktail apparently inspired Deb at Smitten Kitchen to come up with the recipe for her Chocolate Whiskey and Beer Cupcakes, which I used here. Thank goodness she did! These cupcakes are almost unbelievable, the word phenomenal even comes to mind. And, even better, pretty easy to make. You just bake the chocolatey, Guinnessey, wonderful cupcakes.

 

Cupcakes coolin off

Once they’ve cooled you use an apple corer to cut out the centers so that you can fill them with a sinful Irish Whiskey Chocolate Ganache.

Filling the Cupcake

Chocolate Irish Whiskey Ganache filling

Then you frost them with a dreamy Bailey’s Irish Cream frosting. Are you drooling yet? I made them for a get together back in January and folks went wild! These really are a must for your St. Patrick’s Day party. We’re actually having a St. Patrick’s Day celebration later this evening. I will be serving most of the dishes that I posted leading up to today, though most in a more appetizer-like form. Wish me luck, there is a lot to do before 7 pm this evening!

Irish Car Bomb Cupcakes

Recipe from Smitten Kitchen

The Cupcakes:

1 Cup Guinness Stout

1 Cup unsalted butter

3/4 Cup unsweetened cocoa powder

2 Cups all-purpose flour

2 Cups Sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda

3/4 teaspoon salt

2 large eggs

2/3 Cup sour cream

Whiskey Ganache Filling

8 ounces bittersweet chocolate

2/3 Cup heavy cream

2 Tablespoons butter, room temperature

1-2 teaspoons Irish whiskey

Baileys Frosting

3-4 cups confectioners sugar

1/2 cup unsalted butter, room temperature

3-4 Tablespoons Baileys Irish Cream

Directions:

The Cupcakes

Preheat the oven to 350° F. Line 24 cupcakes cups with parchment paper or liners. Bring 1 cup Guinness stout and 1 cup butter to simmer in heavy large saucepan over medium heat. Add cocoa powder and whisk until mixture is smooth. Cool.

Whisk flour, sugar, baking soda and 3/4 teaspoon salt in large bowl to blend. Using electric or stand mixer, beat eggs and sour cream in another large bowl. Add stout-chocolate mixture to egg mixture and beat just to combine. Add flour mixture and beat briefly on slow speed. Using rubber spatula, fold batter until completely combined. Divide batter among cupcake liner, filling them 2/3 of the way. Bake until tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 17 minutes. Cool on wire rack.

Whiskey Ganache:

Chop the chocolate and transfer to a heatproof bowl. Heat the cream until simmering and pour it over the chocolate. Let it sit for one minute and then stir until smooth. Add the butter and whiskey and stir until combined. Let the ganache cool until thick but still soft enough to be piped.

Using your 1″ round cookie cutter or apple corer, cut the centers out of the cooled cupcakes, cutting down 2/3 of the way through the cakes. Fill a piping bag with the Whiskey Ganache. Pipe the ganache into the holes, filling each cupcake to the top.

Baileys Buttercream Frosting:

Whip the butter in the bowl of an electric mixer, or with a hand mixer, for several minutes until it is very light and fluffy. Slowly add the powdered sugar, a few tablespoons at a time. If you add the sugar too quickly you will not only have grainy icing, but you will need to add a lot more sugar to get the icing to reach the correct consistency.

Once the frosting appears to be the correct consistency to ice the cupcakes, drizzle in the Baileys and whip it until combined.

Ice and decorate the cupcakes. For St. Patrick’s Day I used green sprinkles.


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